bubble busting vs. bubble bursting

Michael30000

Senior Member
Russian
Hello everyone,

From the book Thank You for Being Late by Thomas Friedman.

Before 2007, the previous leap forward in our technology platform happened around the year 2000. It was driven by a qualitative change in connectivity. What happened was that the dot-com boom, bubble, and then bust in that time period unleashed a massive overinvestment in fiber-optic cable to carry broadband Internet.... The combination of that bubble and then its bursting—with the dotcom bust in the year 2000—dramatically brought down the price of voice and data connectivity and led, quite unexpectedly, to the wiring of the world to a greater degree than ever before.

Is buuble busting the same as bubble bursting?

Thank you.
 
  • PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    In "and then bust in that time period", bust is an uncountable noun = a sudden financial collapse.
    A bubble = a stock price (or numerous stock prices) that rises in price quickly but which is intrinsically worthless because the rise in price is not rationally driven - they are therefore, like a bubble, very fragile and very susceptible to damage/loss/collapse/bursting.

    When a bubble bursts, the stock(s) becomes worthless and you may have "bust" if the stock has taken a lot of money out of the general market.
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Bust” refers to the cycle known as “boom and bust” (repeated financial expansion and contraction).

    Bubbles burst. They don’t bust.
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    They are different words, but there is a relationship between burst and some uses of bust. Oxford Dictionaries confirms that the meaning 'to break, split or damage' is derived from burst.
    Mid 18th century (originally US, as a noun in the sense ‘an act of bursting or splitting’): variant of burst.
    bust | Definition of bust in English by Oxford Dictionaries

    In the 18th century, some American accents lost the /r/ after a vowel sound. That is why Americans can say ass (rather than arse) and cuss (rather than curse).
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top