bubble drink vs sparkling drink

macforever

Senior Member
Italian
I don't know which one sounds better: I'd like a bubble drink or I'd like a sparkling drink. Maybe it makes no difference. I'm referring to carbonated soft drinks.
 
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  • abenr

    Senior Member
    English, USA
    I don't know which one sounds better: I'd like a bubble drink or I'd like a sparkling drink. Maybe it makes no difference. I'm referring to carbonated soft drinks.
    A sparkling drink is common and sounds much better to these American ears than bubble drink. In fact I've never heard anyone order a bubble drink. Sparkling would be the way I'd translate the Italian "frizzante."
     

    ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    Ha! touché, Abenr!:D
    Yes sparkling water exists here too (some people even drink it, apparently:eek:). So does the term bubbly [n.] ~ I wouldn't ever call champagne 'a bubbly drink', though.
     

    Spira

    Banned
    UK English
    Sparkling drink ~ most likely contains alcohol.
    Fizzy drink ~ most probably doesn't.
    I would say that sparkling is a more adult way of saying fizzy, but that they generally refer to the same thing.

    In the UK a glass of champagne is often referred to as "a glass of bubbly".

    A bubble drink seems a improbable term to me
     

    WyomingSue

    Senior Member
    English--USA
    Macforever, if you want a carbonated soft drink at a restaurant in the States, just ask what kind of "soft drinks" they have and they will tell you what they have. Usually restaurants have contracts with either Pepsi or Coke to only carry their products, so then you will have to pick Coke, Diet Coke, Sprite ,etc.
     

    mplsray

    Senior Member
    I don't know which one sounds better: I'd like a bubble drink or I'd like a sparkling drink. Maybe it makes no difference. I'm referring to carbonated soft drinks.
    Is the sort of drink you have in mind is a heavily carbonated, very sweet drink such as Coca-Cola, Pepsi-Cola, 7-up, that sort of thing? Then in American English, you would ask for a "soda" or "pop," depending on what part of the country you were in. A more formal term would be "carbonated soft drink," just as you used in your question. I would note, however, that juice-based carbonated drinks such as Orangina, sparkling grape juice, and sparkling apple juice are generally not thought of as pop, although they technically fit the term "carbonated soft drink." (They're also available in fewer places in the US than is pop.)
     
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