Bubbling up necessarily means boiling up?

everpine

Senior Member
Korean
Hi, can I get your help?

The peasants traveled to the valley floor only once a month, they said. Natural springs bubbled up here, and the area was blessed with rich soil. Eight thousand feet up in the Andes, with abundant sun, fertile soil, and water, the three peasant families had little need of the outside world.

Does the highlighted words should be understood as boiled up or boiled over, meaning the fountain contains hot water?

Thanks,
 
  • Bigote Blanco

    Senior Member
    No. Probably the cold water just came to the surface. I think the author used "bubbled" as a nice adjective to indicate how the water appeared from the springs. It may have appeared like boiling water - but not necessarily hot.

    Natural hot water springs - would mean hot water.
     

    foxfirebrand

    Senior Member
    Southern AE greatly modified by a 1st-generation Scottish-American mother, and growing up abroad.
    It's rare to see boiling water in nature, but geothermal hot springs and mudpots can be near boiling. It all depends on how deep the source of heat is-- bubbles that rise to the surface of Yellowstone lake, for example, are as cold as the water.

    I agree with the other posters that bubbling can also refer to the turbulence in water that is caused by purely mechanical forces. But when water bubbles up there is some implication, to me, of geothermal activity.
     
    I agree with the other posters that bubbling can also refer to the turbulence in water that is caused by purely mechanical forces. But when water bubbles up there is some implication, to me, of geothermal activity.
    Hmm. I think cold water can bubble up out of the ground under pressure, as from a spring. (In fact, how else would you describe a spring that did not produce a smooth flow?)

    Not to be contrary, but, to me, "bubble up" has no temperature implication at all. In fact, I would assume that water described as bubbling up from the ground was cold unless otherwise described. If it were a thermal spring, I think the description would tend to be "hot water bubbled up ..." or, getting back to the original post, "water boiled up ...," even though it was not literally at the boiling point.

    In fact, even cold water can "boil" if it is very agitated, like heavy seas crashing around rocks. The phrase "boiling up (out of the ground)" could mean very agitated cold water coming to the surface with force and in quantity, as from a broken water main.
     

    foxfirebrand

    Senior Member
    Southern AE greatly modified by a 1st-generation Scottish-American mother, and growing up abroad.
    Not to be contrary, but, to me, "bubble up" has no temperature implication at all. In fact, I would assume that water described as bubbling up from the ground was cold unless otherwise described. If it were a thermal spring, I think the description would tend to be "hot water bubbled up ..." or, getting back to the original post, "water boiled up ...," even though it was not literally at the boiling point.
    Well, I think in this case my perception of things is influenced by my environment-- I live in the mountains, in a zone where thermal springs are plentiful.

    I agree that bubble and even boil can refer to water that's simply in motion, but I'd call that usage figurative. There are many tidepool formations where the incoming breakers are narrowed through an opening where they explode, and they have names like "Devil's Cauldron." But just as often Champagne metaphors are evoked. I think I've seen one with churn in its name.

    Words like babble and burble are also used for the motion or sound of moving water meeting an obstruction-- but I'm not sure I'd use boil to describe a spring. They tend to trickle, and the most vigorous of them well up.

    I guess to me bubble implies a structure of liquid and gas, or a process with more aeration in it than you're likely to see in a spring. Unless you happen to be at Evian or Vichy.

    And let's not forget that the original question specified "bubbling up." Upward motion plus aeration.
     
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