Bucket for bucket [basketball]

Karraspito

Senior Member
Spanish from Spain
Hi everybody,

I haven't been able to find any definition for this expression enywhere. In a translation about basketball I'm doing, it says some player "matched Larry Bird bucket for bucket in a 1988 Playoff Game".
Any ideas what this might mean?

Thank you very much!
 
  • Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    A bucket is a basket -- shooting the basketball through the hoop (basket/bucket) to score.

    This Wikipedia article on Basketball notes that the original basket was literally a peach basket, complete with bottom. After each score, the ball had to be retrieved from the basket. Bucket as become another word for basket, probably because there's a similar shape and function in a basket and a bucket.
     
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    Karraspito

    Senior Member
    Spanish from Spain
    Aaaah, I see! So basically it means that he challenged him very hardly, right? Something like the match was being very equal between both teams, as Larry Bird and the other player were scoring point after point alternatively (bucket for bucket). Is that right?
    Thanks a lot!
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    Another player and Larry Byrd matched each other bucket for bucket means they scored the same number of baskets ... they may have alternated baskets, but it doesn't have to be that way. Rather than A B A B A B A B, it may have been A B A B B A A B. But the totals for each man would have been the same.
     
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    perpend

    Banned
    American English
    It's not point after point.

    It's one point matches another point.

    Maybe that was clear but maybe take it to another realm.

    "Wicket for wicket" in Cricket.
     

    Grefsen

    Senior Member
    English - United States
    I haven't been able to find any definition for this expression enywhere. In a translation about basketball I'm doing, it says some player "matched Larry Bird bucket for bucket in a 1988 Playoff Game".
    Any ideas what this might mean?
    Another player and Larry Byrd matched each other bucket for bucket means they scored the same number of baskets ... they may have alternated baskets, but it doesn't have to be that way. Rather than A B A B A B A B, it may have been A B A B B A A B. But the totals for each man would have been the same.
    As a former basketball player who still follows the sport closely, I've seen "matched bucket for bucket" used many times to describe players on opposing teams who have scored approximately the same amount points during the same amount of time.

    Since Larry Bird was one of the best to ever play professional basketball, it would have been quite an impressive accomplishment for a lesser known player to have been able to match Larry Bird "bucket for bucket" in a playoff game. :thumbsup:

    OK, I see. It's perfectly clear now. You've been amazingly helpful and kind. Awesome, a legend!
    I'm not sure if you knew this already, but one of the most popular nicknames for Larry Bird is "Larry Legend." :)
     

    Karraspito

    Senior Member
    Spanish from Spain
    Cool.
    I learnt another popular yet not so kind nickname for him was The Hick from French Lick. You learn a lot from translating quizes!
    Thanks a lot for your contribution.
     

    Grefsen

    Senior Member
    English - United States
    I'm curious to know where you found the quote "matched Larry Bird bucket for bucket in a 1988 Playoff Game"? When I just did a Google search, the only two results I got were from your WR posts.

    I also thought I would add that "matched bucket for bucket" can be used when a team that is not expected to win a game manages to keep the score close for a quarter or a half.

    I learnt another popular yet not so kind nickname for him was The Hick from French Lick.
    I doubt that Bird is offended by this nickname since he's very proud of where he's from, but my guess is that he probably prefers the nickname "Larry Legend" over "The Hick from French Lick." :)
     
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    Karraspito

    Senior Member
    Spanish from Spain
    It's actually from a translation I did for a customer, something for a smartphone app. That's all I can tell you, I don't want to violate the contract regarding confidentiality.
    Best wishes.
     

    Grefsen

    Senior Member
    English - United States
    It's actually from a translation I did for a customer, something for a smartphone app. That's all I can tell you, I don't want to violate the contract regarding confidentiality.
    Best wishes.
    Thanks! I wouldn't want you to violate any confidentiality agreements. :)

    During one of my searches I found an example from earlier this year where one of the current best NBA players "went bucket for bucket" with an entire team:
    In the closing minutes of the game, Curry went bucket for bucket with the whole Nets team as they scored by committee. The end of the game became even more intense . . . playoff intensity. Stephen Curry was a one man show and individually he put on a scoring barrage of a show.
    http://www.isportstimes.com/articles/10289/20140116/golden-state-warriors-miss-out-nba-record.htm
     
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    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Just in case anybody had another impression of what a "French Lick" might be, it's a town in southern Indiana. (One of the 50 United States).
     

    perpend

    Banned
    American English
    I also thought I would add that "matched bucket for bucket" can be used when a team that is not expected to win a game manages to keep the score close for a quarter or a half.
    That's the meaning for me, it means throwing it down in a game. One bucket gets match by another. But, it can mean one player in comparison to another, and the game can come down to the wire.

    #13: "Just in case anybody had another impression of what a "French Lick" might be, it's a town in southern Indiana. (One of the 50 United States)." No worries, basketball players can do that nowadays.
     

    Grefsen

    Senior Member
    English - United States
    That's the meaning for me, it means throwing it down in a game. One bucket gets match by another. But, it can mean one player in comparison to another, and the game can come down to the wire.
    Here in an excerpt from an article that appeared last month in the Lexington (Kentucky) Herald-Leader, the expression "matched Florida bucket-for-bucket in the first half" was used when the Pittsburgh Panthers trailed the heavily favored Florida Gators by five points after the first half. However, if top-seeded Florida hadn't made a last second three point shot, Pittsburgh would have only been behind by two points.

    http://www.kentucky.com/2014/03/22/3155135/recap-florida-vs-pittsburgh.html
    The ninth-seeded Panthers were coming off a thorough 29-point decision over Colorado on Thursday and matched Florida bucket-for-bucket in the first half before making just 35 percent (9-of-26) of their shots in the second.
     
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    perpend

    Banned
    American English
    The OP says that some player matched Larry Bird bucket-for-bucket, so it seems like it's between two players, in the context.
     
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