Buckle

aisha93

Senior Member
Arabic/Persian(larestani)
Hi everybody,

What is the meaning of (buckle) in the following sentence?

The net feddanic revenue increased by an annual rate statistically signified reached about 76.1 pound per feddan which is not representing a buckle to the farmers to cultivate this crop.


This paragraph is from my University book, which is talking about the production of soybean in Egypt.

 
  • aisha93

    Senior Member
    Arabic/Persian(larestani)
    This seems rather perplexing to me. It's nothing that I've ever seen before. (I've not seen 'feddanic' either :( )
    Don't bother about (feddanic). It comes from the word "Feddan" which is Arabic.
    Which here you can read about it: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Feddan

    But just focus on the word "Buckle", what could it mean?
    could it mean "something profitable" in this context? because that makes a little sense...
     

    eyeofhorus

    Senior Member
    English - Ireland
    I agree with Beryl. Also, this entire sentence is not natural English at all - there are parts of the sentence that are just not grammatical - ('signified'?), and the end should probably read 'which does not represent...'.

    'Buckle' has a number of meanings. In a context like this, it could mean something like 'collapse/breakdown', but the meaning of this word is not really the main issue in such a messy sentence.
     

    WyomingSue

    Senior Member
    English--USA
    The whole sentence is not well written. It looks to me like it was badly translated into English from some other language. I would hypothesize, if this is allowed in WR, that the original language used a word meaning "attraction," and the person used a thesaurus to connect "attraction" to a word meaning something that draws two things together, and ended up with "buckle" (an object that connects the two ends of a belt).
    My hypothesis is assuming that 76.1 pounds of whatever they are talking about is not a high yield and doesn't attract farmers to cultivate the crop. If 76.1 pounds per feddan is a good yield, then my whole theory goes out the window!

    NOTE: With the rest of the paragraph added in post #7 I see that "pound" was the currency, not the weight, but my basic hypothesis still stands.
     
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    Beryl from Northallerton

    Senior Member
    British English
    Well, given my initial reading of the sentence, I would have expected it to mean something like 'hurdle', 'barrier' or 'hindrance', but as I say, I'm unaware of 'buckle' ever meaning that, and can find nothing in dictionaries that might support such a reading.
    What would you expect it to mean, given the context, aisha93?

    ADDED: cross-posted with eofh and WS.
     

    aisha93

    Senior Member
    Arabic/Persian(larestani)
    This is the whole paragraph:

    The study showed the decrease of the cultivated area with Soya bean with an annual rate statistically signified reached about 2.3 thousand Feddan and the stabilization of the Feddanic productivity of the yield around the average that reached about 1.216 ton during the period of study (1990-2008), also the cost of production statistically signified reached about 75.8 Pound in the time, the net Feddanic revenue increased by an annual rate statistically signified reached about 76.1 pound per Feddan which is not representing a buckle to the farmers to cultivate this crop.
     
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    aisha93

    Senior Member
    Arabic/Persian(larestani)
    I agree with Beryl. Also, this entire sentence is not natural English at all - there are parts of the sentence that are just not grammatical - ('signified'?), and the end should probably read 'which does not represent...'.

    'Buckle' has a number of meanings. In a context like this, it could mean something like 'collapse/breakdown', but the meaning of this word is not really the main issue in such a messy sentence.
    I too, noticed , and still noticing some weird structures and sentences in the book I am reading!

    However, I pasted the whole paragraph there, so that it might get clearer.
     

    aisha93

    Senior Member
    Arabic/Persian(larestani)
    The whole sentence is not well written. It looks to me like it was badly translated into English from some other language. I would hypothesize, if this is allowed in WR, that the original language used a word meaning "attraction," and the person used a thesaurus to connect "attraction" to a word meaning something that draws two things together, and ended up with "buckle" (an object that connects the two ends of a belt).
    My hypothesis is assuming that 76.1 pounds of whatever they are talking about is not a high yield and doesn't attract farmers to cultivate the crop. If 76.1 pounds per feddan is a good yield, then my whole theory goes out the window!
    The book actually is published by non-native speakers (Arabs).
    Your analysis makes a lot of sense and I guess this is the meaning of the word here, because it cannot be interpreted otherwise. Anyway, 76.1 (pounds per Feddan) is not a good yield, that is why I'm upholding your theory. :rolleyes:

    By the way, what do you mean by WR? I'm sorry but I'm not familiar with the abbreviations used here.

    Thanks
     

    Beryl from Northallerton

    Senior Member
    British English
    Of course, the other likely interpretation is the opposite of my original thought, and that is that by 'buckle' they meant 'incentive' or 'stimulus', in which case the writer may have mistaken 'spur' for 'buckle' (they are both found on some kinds of boot). ADDED: WR = Word Reference
     

    Biffo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Just to add to the above. The paper can be read here:


    An economic study of the production of soybean in Egypt
    Nagwa El Agroudy Soheir Mokhtar
    Ezzat Awad Zaghlol Mahmoud El Gebaly
    Agricultural Economy Department, National research Centre-Cairo, Egypt
    http://www.scihub.org/ABJNA/PDF/2011/2/ABJNA-2-2-221-225.pdf

    It is clear right from the first paragraph that there are errors in the English, e.g.

    The Soybean oil is used directly in food and preventing Blood pressure, also Arteriosclerosis. It
    also contains lot of the essential vitamins for the body, it was started is use in Egypt from
    the year 1976, it is also a basic source of protein in the poultry and animal feed...

    1. The only way to prevent blood pressure is to kill someone! :D They mean high blood pressure.
    2. "it was started is use" is ungrammatical.
    3. There are other minor errors in the above.

    I go along with Beryl that 'incentive' makes the most sense (also spur makes sense).
     

    aisha93

    Senior Member
    Arabic/Persian(larestani)
    What a shame!
    A university book is full of errors...they could have used Microsoft word at least! :(
    Anyway, I thank you all for making the effort to understand this nonsense and clarify it to me..very helpful.
     
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