budgie smugglers

bennymix

Senior Member
Oxford has accepted the term (from AuE), so it's in BE, I guess, but has it crossed to the US and AE?

No Cookies | Daily Telegraph

Men ditch traditional budgie smugglers for world first design of BCNU’s ‘hero’ swimwear


Kimberley Caines, Southern Courier
July 10, 2016 10:00am


FORGET show through! Men can now feel confident, heroic and invincible in budgie smugglers thanks to a world first design by a Mascot resident.
 
  • Sparky Malarky

    Moderator
    English - US
    Oh my goodness. First time I've ever heard it. It does conjure up a mental picture, but no, it's not a familiar term in AE. For one thing, most people in this country have probably never heard of a budgie.
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    The Oxford English Dictionary is a dictionary of English, not British English. That's the Australian Daily Telegraph you are linking to. The OED entry is
    budgie smugglers n. slang (orig. and chiefly Austral.) a pair of short, close-fitting men's swimming trunks; also in sing. (chiefly in attrib. use). [With reference to the appearance of the male genitals in figure-hugging trunks.]

    In form budgy smuggler a proprietary name in Australia.
    I don't think it could be said to be "in" BE. There is a citation from the British Daily Telegraph
    2011 Daily Tel. 23 Sept. 22/1 The swimwear company Speedo, known for its skimpy ‘budgie smuggler’ briefs, is suing a..blogger.
    Note that the term is in quotation marks.
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    AusE has quite a few terms that are not (yet) in UK BE. This might even be in that category, so UK residents please pile on :)

    (Cross posted; thanks Andy, I wondered:))
     

    owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    I agree with Sparky, Benny. I've heard "plum smugglers" and "banana hammock" used to describe Speedos, but "budgie smuggler" is a new one for me.:rolleyes:
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    You don't get the budgie / bulgy thing and it sounds rather technical. We'll just stick with banana hammock.
    Not sure the budgy bulgy "alliteration" is a big part of the original appeal - it's the size and shape of a budgie that brings the term to life:eek: (Note that budgerigar is a specific member of the parakeet family with appropriate size and shape (!) while parakeets are much more varied and can be much bigger than budgerigars.) But if you were not familiar with the word budgie, I can see how it the bulgy association might, erm, arise;)
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    Not sure the budgy bulgy "alliteration" is a big part of the original appeal - it's the size and shape of a budgie that brings the term to life:eek: (Note that budgerigar is a specific member of the parakeet family with appropriate size and shape (!) while parakeets are much more varied and can be much bigger than budgerigars.) But if you were not familiar with the word budgie, I can see how it the bulgy association might, erm, arise;)
    The common name for specific birds that are called budgies in BrE is "parakeet" in AmE. Other types of parakeets have specific names.
    I don't think parakeets are particularly genital-shaped and no more so than many other things.
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    The common name for specific birds that are called budgies in BrE is "parakeet" in AmE. Other types of parakeets have specific names.
    I don't think parakeets are particularly genital-shaped and no more so than many other things.
    The main point was that many birds that are called parakeets are much larger than budgies, a fact probably not known by people unfamiliar with the word budgie. When you pack a budgie in a tight swimsuit the "quasi- cylindrical"/phallic proportions and size ....
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    The main point was that many birds that are called parakeets are much larger than budgies, , a fact probably not known by people unfamiliar with the word budgie.
    People unfamiliar with the word budgie would not know they were the size of parakeets, lions or articulated lorries (or articulated lorikeets).
    The birds that are called parakeets in AmE are exactly the same size as budgies because they are budgies.
    Quaker parrots are biologically parakeets but we don't call them parakeets in common parlance. We call budgies parakeets.
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    People unfamiliar with the word budgie would not know they were the size of parakeets, lions or articulated lorries (or articulated lorikeets).
    The birds that are called parakeets in AmE are exactly the same size as budgies because they are budgies.
    Quaker parrots are biologically parakeets but we don't call them parakeets in common parlance. We call budgies parakeets.
    All budgies are parakeets but not all parakeets are budgies. Are we far enough off-topic yet?:)
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    All budgies are parakeets but not all parakeets are budgies. Are we far enough off-topic yet?:)
    You're not listening. ;) That's BrE. In common AmE of non-ornithologists, budgies don't exist and parakeets are what you call budgies. If you go to the pet store, you can buy a parakeet. It will be what you call a budgie. If you show the average American some pictures of birds and say "Which one is the parakeet?," they will pick what you call the "budgie" not the Quaker parrot or the ring-necked parakeet or the lineolated parakeet or ...
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    The phrase made some headway in BE a few years back but doesn't seem to have caught on... and now budgie-smugglers are being ditched...
     

    ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    It's extremely well-known in this household, and no doubt in other households where gentlemen take an interest in that sort of thing.
     
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