bueno, vaca (pronunciation - b, v)

gddrew

Senior Member
United States, English
GMS said in another thread:

We also have troubles with B and V because we pronounce them in the same way so we usually say: "B de bueno" or "B larga" and "V de vaca" or "V corta".

Is this true in all Spanish-speaking countries? I ask because sometimes I think I hear a difference, depending on the speaker. An American of Cuban descent recently corrected me when I pronounced viniste as biniste, saying I should pronounce the V as the v in the English victory.

Un saludo,
Greg
 
  • Drake

    Senior Member
    Spain (Spanish & Catalan)
    Strictly speaking the V should be pronounced with a sound between a "B" and an "F" (like in French). The point is, in Spain nobody speaks like this and the most part of the people don't even know that. So, the sound of B and V is considered the same. However, I don't know if it is true for other countries.
    By the way, in Spain we call them “Be” and “Uve” or “be alta” and “be baja”. I’ve never heard “be larga” before.

    Bye!
     

    Pablete

    Senior Member
    Spain - Spanish
    Hey Drake, I found you in another thread! That´s great, someone could think we like to discuss about languages.

    I agree with you than v should be pronounced lip with teeth. However, quite recently, RAE said b and v must be pronounced the same. Probably in some years time they will say the opposite.
     

    lauranazario

    Moderatrix
    Español puertorriqueño & US English
    Drake said:
    Strictly speaking the V should be pronounced with a sound between a "B" and an "F" (like in French). The point is, in Spain nobody speaks like this and the most part of the people don't even know that. So, the sound of B and V is considered the same. However, I don't know if it is true for other countries.
    By the way, in Spain we call them “Be” and “Uve” or “be alta” and “be baja”. I’ve never heard “be larga” before.

    Bye!

    V = Uve
    B = Bé (o bé labial).
     

    Maeron

    Senior Member
    Canada, English
    In Mexico, they are called "v chica" and "b grande". The explanation I have been given is that in "correct" Spanish, "b" and "v" are indistinguishable, and the pronunciation depends on where they fall in the word, not on whether the letter is a "b" or a "v".

    However in some periods and in some countries, a sort of "hypercorrection" was in force, and students were taught that a "b" should be pronounced different than a "v". Maybe someone who has direct experience of this can tell us in which countries (besides Cuba) this took place.
     

    Drake

    Senior Member
    Spain (Spanish & Catalan)
    lauranazario said:
    V = Uve
    B = Bé (o bé labial).

    Hola Laura,
    siento decirte que Be se escribe sin tilde. Aunque es aguda y acaba en vocal, es un monosílabo y como tal, a menos que exista otro que se escriba igual pero tenga diferente significado, no lleva tilde.
    Mas / Más
    Se / sé
    el / él
    ...

    Un saludo
     

    Lala

    Member
    Argentina - Español
    In Argentina, both B and V are pronounced as the English "B", though some kind of difference is thought to children in primary school when they first learn the ABC...
    Anyway, one of the main spelling mistakes is the confusion of B ("B" larga) and V ("ve" corta) since their phonetic difference is generally unnoticed

    :)
     

    Artrella

    Banned
    BA
    Spanish-Argentina
    Lala said:
    In Argentina, both B and V are pronounced as the English "B", though some kind of difference is thought to children in primary school when they first learn the ABC...
    Anyway, one of the main spelling mistakes is the confusion of B ("B" larga) and V ("ve" corta) since their phonetic difference is generally unnoticed

    :)


    Lala, when I was in primary (centuries ago) we were taught- and obliged to pronounce in that way- "B" labio labial and "V" labio dental. Es como en fonética que te enseñan los places of articulation, eg: Bilabial, Dental, Palato-Alveolar, Velar, etc.
    Nowadays they don't teach that difference and they say B=V (which in my opinion is wrong). What you say about the spelling mistakes would be solved by differentiating the pronunciation. The same happens with us, Argentinians, with the S,C and Z. Spaniards don't have that problem, no?
    Art :)
     

    Lala

    Member
    Argentina - Español
    Artrella said:
    Lala, when I was in primary (centuries ago) we were taught- and obliged to pronounce in that way- "B" labio labial and "V" labio dental. Art :)

    Yes, I know many years ago that was a "phonetic rule" to follow...

    I agree that many spelling problems could be avoided by changing phonetic rules (from the very beginning, from the time a baby learns to speak) There are so many problems in learning and understanding (which go far beyond the B and V confusion) that arise from the way that many people learn to speak. But that is a different thread ...

    Saludos!!
     

    Nienna

    New Member
    Chile, Español
    En Chile le decimos "b larga" pero sólo hacemos la diferencia al escribir... sólo usamos la /v/ (uve) cuando hablamos
     

    Nienna

    New Member
    Chile, Español
    creo ke no kedo claro ... jajajjajaj pero al escribir usamos b y v pero al pronunciar palabras con b o v solo utilizamos /v/ aunke se escriba con b
     
    Hello:

    In México you can say:

    Ve de vaca y Be de burro
    Be grande y Ve chica
    B y u-Ve.

    The formal names are:

    B labial

    V labiodental:
    Debe de pronunciarse presionando labios contra dientes, por eso se le dice labiodental y no solo * labial como la B.


    *
    Labial. A. Lippenlaut, Gerundetlaut; F. Arrondi. 1.- Consonantes labiales. Se da este nombre, con escasa presición, a las bilabiales y labiodentales

    Labiodental. A. Lippenzahnlaut. Articulación cuyos órganos activo y pasivo son, respectivamente, el labio inferior y el borde de los incisivos superiores

    But nowadays, it is common to listen both letters with the same sound. Similar situations are c, s, z, y, i, etc

    http://www.conaculta.gob.mx/saladeprensa/2002/25mar/lengua.htm


    If you want to "read something" about the differences between letters, you may visit these pages:

    http://www.esperantomex.org/contexto/votos.html

    http://www.elsoldesanluis.com.mx/elsoldesanluis/040229/nac_int/7nac_int.asp
     

    Beregond

    New Member
    Spain / spanish
    In spanish, B (be) and V (uve) should have the same sound, althought children are teached at school to pronounce them different at school because is useful for learning orthography.

    But the "Diccionario de la Real Academia de la Lengua Espa/ola" is clear:
    v.
    1. f. Vigésima quinta letra del abecedario espa/ol, y vigésima segunda del orden latino internacional, que representa un fonema consonántico labial y sonoro, el mismo que la b en todos los países de lengua espa/ola. Su nombre es uve, ve, ve baja o ve corta.
     

    jmx

    Senior Member
    Spain / Spanish
    gddrew said:
    Is this true in all Spanish-speaking countries?
    I've had some fairly heated discussions about this issue, for example this one in the French-Spanish Forum (The most significant part is in Spanish) :

    http://forum.wordreference.com/showthread.php?t=15025

    The key point, that was confirmed in that thread, is that no native Spanish speaker does the distinction spontaneously, some do it but only because they have been taught so in school. But then, if you monitor their speech, you'll see that they are not consistent and often "forget" to pronounce the v's as labiodental, the quicker and more relaxed they speak, the more likely they don't make any difference.

    A different thing is that the single phoneme represented in writing by b and v corresponds to 2 different sounds, one oclusive and one fricative, depending on wether they are between vowels or not.
     

    MadGato

    Senior Member
    ESPAÑA Español
    Hola:
    La lengua no nace tal cual lo conocemos hoy, sino que es una evolución de sonidos y grafías, que en un momento dado y de forma centralizada se intenta unificar.
    En este sentido la Real Academia Española de la lengua dice que en el castellano actualmente existen dos letras distintas que son la b (léase b) y v (léase uve), pero que fonológicamente tienen el mismo sonido.
    Por tanto, en el castellano de España, la gramática defiende que no hay distinciones fonéticas entre dichas letras.
    Otra cosa es que por herencia, no olvidemos que el lenguaje se aprende básicamente oyendo, en según que zonas se pronuncien igual o se les haga diferencia. Esas pequeñas diferencias en la pronunciación de las letras hacen que existan los acentos típicos de cada zona.
    Si algún día llegara a extenderse mucho la diferencia de pronunciación, pues la RAE tendría que cambiar su criterio y acoger la nueva norma.
    Nunca olvidemos que la RAE no está para imponer formas de hablar o escribir, sino para normalizar lo que los ciudadanos en su diario proceder van convirtiendo en norma común de uso.
    Saludos.
     

    quinella66

    New Member
    USA - English/Spanish/little Italian
    This is always a fun one. At my previous job, as software engineer, I used to give computer (Unix) commands over the phone and spell them out to Spanish speakers since they were cryptic abbreviated English words (for instance, "password" is "passwd", etc.). Usually I would say "b de boca" and "v de vaca" though "b grande" and "v chica" were also common. I also remember being told in Spanish class that the "v" was "uve" but in my experience, mostly in South America, I usually used "v de vaca" to distinguish it. I pronounce them the same.
     

    Calario

    Senior Member
    Spain Spanish
    El porblema de distinguir la B de la V es que se puede llegar a confundir la V con la F; imaginad ¿has dicho "vaca" animal o "faca" arma? ¿O "vocal" de letra o "focal" de foco? La fonética del castellano ha evolucionado simplificándose (como ha ocurrido con la h aspirada, que ya no existe, salvo marginalmente en algnas zonas), pero la escritura mantiene la variedad... ¿esto es bueno, malo?
     

    typistemilio

    Senior Member
    México, D.F. Español-Spanish/Some of english/maaya t'aan
    Calario said:
    La fonética del castellano ha evolucionado simplificándose (como ha ocurrido con la h aspirada, que ya no existe, salvo marginalmente en algnas zonas), pero la escritura mantiene la variedad... ¿esto es bueno, malo?

    Depende... ¿De qué depende?... De según como se mire, todo depende.

    Ya bien decían los romanos: "Beati hispani, quibus bibere vivere est." (Benditos los hispanos, para quienes vivir es beber, nótese el juego de palabras;))

    ¡Saludillos!
     

    Pedro P. Calvo Morcillo

    Senior Member
    España, español.
    b y v se pronuncian igual. Creo que sería deseable que con el tiempo el alfabeto español se ajustase más aún a la fonética. Podría empezarse desterrando la hache del alfabeto...
     

    Daddy

    New Member
    USA/English
    Hello everyone,

    I have gone back and forth in discussing this problem with students and in teaching phonetics. I have had native Spanish speakers in class who argue that they should be pronounced differently, but then I hear them pronounce them the same part of the time. Or I have heard people pronounce them the same, and then in very emphatic speech pronounce them differently.

    I was just going over the spelling problem from a historical viewpoint and it is quite obvious that several centuries ago /b/ and /v/ had completely merged in some areas, and that not until considerably later was the spelling of this (or these) phoneme(s) changed back to their historically original spelling in Latin in most, but not all cases. Just think of the verb "haber" which was most often spelled as "aver" in medieval times. Or take "basura" which in latin was "versura".

    In Latin, "v" represented /w/, not /v/, though it obviously evolved into /v/ in much of the Romance world. But in Spain it seems to have not evolved immediately (if at all) into a labio-dental. Or perhpas the two were in competition at some historical moment, and continue to do so dialectally. I recall that when I was in Honduras several years ago, I heard alternations between the sounds (bilabial stop) and [v] (labio-dental fricative, though a bilabial fricative is the pan-hispanic norm), but not along the lines of "b" and "v". So, "Vamos" as [bamos], but "está bien" as [está vien]. It is obvious, whatever the case, that at some point the norm came to be purely bilabial pronunciations, both stops and fricatives.

    A similar case can be made for /f/, which in some rural dialects is bilabial, though the pan-hispanic norm is labio-dental. At some historical moment it could be argued that the Spanish norm for /f/ was instead bilabial, which lead to its aspiration and loss at the beginning of words. In many rural dialects one can still find aspirated /f/ pronounced as , such as [huimos] for [fuimos].

    What is likely is that in the midst of all this competition between bilabial and labio-dental pronunciations, the schools have stepped in and attempted to impose a norm taken from the orthography, which itself was not well motivated historically.

    So the struggle continues, as well as such fascinating debates as this one.

    Cheers.
     

    Calario

    Senior Member
    Spain Spanish
    Con la globalización estamos contínuamente adoptando palabras extranjeras, junot con us pronunciación, lo que provoca que al escribirlas la fonética se complique cada vez más, un ejemplo curiosos, aquí escribimos "Estas navidades me voy a comprar la play station", y la forma en que lo pronunciamos, ni siquiera es posible escribirla en castellano, y - además - la pronuciación de "play station" es parecida, pero diferente a la forma en la que la pronunciaria un inglés... ¿vamos a necesitar nuevas normas para la fonética?
    Esta problemática complica mucho los sistemas de síntesis y reconocimiento de voz, que cada vez tienen más excepciones que reglas, porque hay que registrar la pronunciación de palabras completas.
    Otro caso muy peculiar: hay un entrenador de fútbol en España que es holandés, se llama Rijkaard y lo pronunciamos "reigcard", vamos ¡nada que ver con la pronunciación real!
     

    Galianne

    Senior Member
    USA
    Cuba-Spanish
    Originally Posted by Pedro P. Calvo Morcillo
    b y v se pronuncian igual. Creo que sería deseable que con el tiempo el alfabeto español se ajustase más aún a la fonética. Podría empezarse desterrando la hache del alfabeto...
    Completamente de acuerdo. No sabes la cantidad de problemas que me ha dado la h en mi nombre.

    Creo que si se diferencia o no la pronunciación de la B y la V depende del origen del hablante, del acento, talvés de si la persona tiene algún problema del habla.
    En mi país ambas letras se pronuncian de igual forma. Yo particularmente al escribir me ayudo de las reglas de ortografía. No hay de otra.

    Hasta pronto.
     

    Yael

    Senior Member
    US
    Argentina, Spanish
    Yo creo que no existe ninguna diferencia fonética, inclusive teniendo en cuenta que a veces la hacemos, aunque sin prestar atención a la ortografía. Mi padre y muchas personas que conozco tienen problemas en reconocer la diferencia entre los dos sonidos, por ejemplo al hablar e inglés. Un diálogo típico sería algo así como:
    A:"¿Cómo se dice terciopelo en inglés?"
    B: "velvet"
    A:"¿belbet?"
    B: "no, velvet"
    A: "¿y yo que dije?"
    B: "belbet"
    A: "¿cuál es la diferencia?"
    B:"es velvet, con v corta"
    Este tipo de aclaraciones las tengo que dar demasiado seguido como para considerar que existe una diferencia fonética entre b y v en español
     

    beaconb

    New Member
    españa
    ¡¡Hola amiguitos!! No os compliqueis tanto la vida, en España no hay ninguna diferencia entre la pronunciación de la "v" y de la "b". Se pronuncian exactamente igual y se distingue entre una y otra por la ortografía de la palabra en cuestión. ¡Ah! y se dice "be" y "uve", nada de "be larga", "b corta" o cosas parecidas. Un saludo a todos desde España;)
     

    supercrom

    Banned
    Homo peruvianus, practising AE n' learning BE
    lauranazario said:
    V = Uve
    B = Be (o be labial).
    Hola Laura, dice Vd. que una es "uve" (V) y la otra es "be" (B), estoy de acuerdo con ello. Mas mi pregunta acerca de "be labial" sería: Si una es "be labial", ¿acaso la otra es "be no labial"?

    Considero errónea esa denominación porque AMBAS son labiales (producidas con los labios).

    Saludos

    Supercrom
     

    Mexican in NJ

    New Member
    Mexico
    Hola Laura, dice Vd. que una es "uve" (V) y la otra es "be" (B), estoy de acuerdo con ello. Mas mi pregunta acerca de "be labial" sería: Si una es "be labial", ¿acaso la otra es "be no labial"?

    Considero errónea esa denominación porque AMBAS son labiales (producidas con los labios).

    Saludos

    Supercrom

    I grew up in Mexico. I am 40 yrs old now. But when I attended school up to University level, I was thought that b and v had different sounds. The letter b was then called "b labial" and the letter v was called "v labiodental". Therefore the v was pronouced by putting your lower lip against your top teeth. I do not know if this still true.

    Up to 6th grade we used to conjugate verbs with "vosotros" and then we were told (towards the end of that year) not to use that anymore and use "ustedes" instead.

    Spanish, like any other language, are always evolving.
     

    Yael

    Senior Member
    US
    Argentina, Spanish
    I grew up in Mexico. I am 40 yrs old now. But when I attended school up to University level, I was thought that b and v had different sounds. The letter b was then called "b labial" and the letter v was called "v labiodental". Therefore the v was pronouced by putting your lower lip against your top teeth. I do not know if this still true.

    Up to 6th grade we used to conjugate verbs with "vosotros" and then we were told (towards the end of that year) not to use that anymore and use "ustedes" instead.

    Spanish, like any other language, are always evolving.

    Eso tiene que ver con que la idea acerca de la gramática de un idioma va cambiando. Antes solía pensarse que la función de un gramático era dictar reglas que los demás debían seguir, basadas en la manera "correcta" de hablar en idioma, que se encontraría por ejemplo en libros en lugar de revistas, etc
    Hoy en día se considera que la gramática debe ser descriptiva más que prescriptiva. Es decir, debe simplemente informar acerca de como habla la gente, no indicar como debe hablar. Es por ello que antes se enseñaba a los niños en Latinoamérica a usar vosotros, a pesar de que nadie lo dice. Se lo consideraba la manera "correcta" de hablar. Y es lo mismo con b y v. Nadie en el idioma castellano hace una diferencia entre el sonido de la b y la v, pero antes se consideraba "correcto" tomarlas como dos sonidos distintos. Eso es todo.
    Para comprobar que esto es cierto, basta tratar de encontrar dos palabras en castellano que difieran solo por la b o v en su "pronunciación". Estoy segura que existen, pero deben ser muy pocas porque no se me ocurre ninguna, mientras que en inglés, que sí hay una diferencia, me resulta mucho más facil encontrarlas (vest-best, boat-vote (lo que importa es la pronunciación no la ortografía))
     

    alexacohen

    Banned
    Spanish. Spain
    Creo que sería deseable que con el tiempo el alfabeto español se ajustase más aún a la fonética. Podría empezarse desterrando la hache del alfabeto...

    Sí, pero, ¿A qué fonética? Porque entonces, no habría un español. Habría diecisiete mil... según la región en donde se hablase. Y si no, míra este ejemplo:
    creo ke no kedo claro
    Alexa
     

    lazarus1907

    Senior Member
    Spanish, Spain
    Hola Laura,
    siento decirte que Be se escribe sin tilde.
    Siento decirte que después de 'Hola', y antes de Laura, se usa una coma. Por otro lado, después del saludo se usan los dos puntos, y en la línea siguiente se comienza con mayúscula. El nombre de la letra be no se escribe con mayúscula.

    Strictly speaking the V should be pronounced with a sound between a "B" and an "F" (like in French).
    En catalán no sé, pero en español no:

    3. No existe en español diferencia alguna en la pronunciación de las letras b y v. Las dos representan hoy el sonido bilabial sonoro /b/. La ortografía española mantuvo por tradición ambas letras, que en latín representaban sonidos distintos. En el español medieval hay abundantes muestras de confusión entre una y otra grafía, prueba de su confluencia progresiva en la representación indistinta del mismo sonido, confluencia que era ya general en el siglo xvi. La pronunciación de la v como labiodental no ha existido nunca en español, y solo se da de forma espontánea en hablantes valencianos o mallorquines y en los de algunas zonas del sur de Cataluña, cuando hablan castellano, por influencia de su lengua regional.

    Diccionario panhispánico de dudas ©2005
     

    JB

    Senior Member
    English (AE)
    Hola Laura, dice Vd. que una es "uve" (V) y la otra es "be" (B), estoy de acuerdo con ello. Mas mi pregunta acerca de "be labial" sería: Si una es "be labial", ¿acaso la otra es "be no labial"?
    Considero errónea esa denominación porque AMBAS son labiales (producidas con los labios).

    I am going to write in English, since the original question is from New Jersey.

    1. I don't have the best eyes, but I did not notice anyone mentioning that--even if B and V are the same--the actual pronunciation (how I actually hear Latinos speak, no matter what the books say) varies depending on whether the letter comes at the beginning of the word, in the middle, or after certain letters. (Actually "word" is not correct. I should say "breath group", as in Spanish and all languages we speak in groups of sounds, so that without any conscious attention to it, sounds change depending on the sounds that come before or after them.)

    2. Re "bilabial" vs. "labiodental", in English there is a most definite difference, and while the distinction is somewhat arbitrary, I see that even with Spanish speakers, for an initial B/V (e.g. Burro, Vaca" the sound is close to an American "B". Although even with that sound, Americans (generalizing) tend to press the lips together hard, while Spanish speakers do not. In fact, sometimes the lips just approch each other, and barely make contact, and sometimes only get close, so that "bueno" can sound (to a foreigner) almost like "ueno."

    3. Re "labiodental", while I understand your point, in fact, when the B/V appears in the middle of a word (breath group), it is more like an American "V", so that "cabra" sounds more like "cavra". The bottom lip does not touch the upper one, or even approach it, but moves toward the front teeth. In English it would make firm contact. In Spanish it just moves in that direction. Same for "habla", "cavar", etc. So it is useful label, at least for accent training, even if not 100% accurate. (ALL labels are somewhat arbitrary, ¿no?.)

    4. Lastly, when I am trying to teach a gringo how to pronounce Spanish like a native, I explain the above, and add "pretend like you are drunk, or just came from the dentist and the novocaine hasn't worn off yet.

    Finally, lastly, I would say to Miss New Jersey :)) ), if I have not already wated your time with information you already knew, thnk about "sounds" as not necessarily being the same as letters. In English, we can "impossible" because the "imp" combination flows more naturally in the mouth, and "inconceivable" because the "inc" combination works better (vs. inp or imc), even though both are variations of the same prefix meaning "not." Similar issues apply to the B/V pronunciation. Try pronouncing "embarasada" with an American "v" sound, you will find it difficult, and will naturally go towards a "b" sound, even though it is in the middle of a word. (There are other "rules" in the grammar books; you can look them up, or start a separate thread.)

    My apologizes for writing the longest thread I ever have. I hope it was of interest and benefit to some foreros. And I apologize in advance for any typos.
     

    roxcyn

    Senior Member
    USA
    American English [AmE]
    Jbruce, refer to the site I listed, when a b OR v is between a vowel it is an "espirante," it is the equivalent of making a "b" sound but not touching the lips together. The V sound as in English is not said in Spanish because a v is voiced while the b sound is not in Spanish.

    For more clarification and how to make the sound with your own mouth, go to the above website that I mentioned. It shows you how to make it and explains what you are doing with your mouth.

    I wish you the best.
     

    EmmyD49

    New Member
    English - USA
    El Novato :

    Hola! Estoy haciendo un ensayo que se trate del tema de la pronunciacion de b y v. Quiero navegar los sitios de web que ud. dio en su "post", pero no funcionan.
    Me puede ayudar encontrar los sitios? No se que onda.

    Gracias!
    Emilie
     

    sniffrat

    Senior Member
    English, UK
    I met a woman from Lima, Peru. Instead of saying "Boy a trabajar" - she said "Voy a ......" (English pronunciation). Can anyone tell me, is this just a "Peru" thing? I've never heard it anywhere else!
     

    jmx

    Senior Member
    Spain / Spanish
    I met a woman from Lima, Peru. Instead of saying "Boy a trabajar" - she said "Voy a ......" (English pronunciation). Can anyone tell me, is this just a "Peru" thing? I've never heard it anywhere else!
    Many people in Latinamerica and even in Spain firmly believe that a labiodental pronunciation is the "correct" one for 'v' in Spanish. In fact the "Academia de la lengua" defended this position in the past, but not any more. I've noticed that, for at least one country, Chile, most people speak that way. What I'd like to know is :

    ¿ Do they also pronounce labiodental v's in quick, colloquial speech ?

    ¿ Are they consistent in pronouncing every v that way, or only some ?

    ¿ Do they learn this pronunciation as children, in the natural way of listening and mimicking, or rather they are taught it at school ?

    For the moment I don't know the answers for these questions.
     

    lazarus1907

    Senior Member
    Spanish, Spain
    In college, Spanish was my minor, but I was never taught that there was a difference in the pronounciation of b or v like there is in english. My father, who went up to high school in México is the only one who ever said that there was "b labial" y "v dental." I'd like to know what the members think.
    Both b and v are pronounced the same in standard Spanish: bi-labial. The dental pronounciation of the "v" is believed to be correct due to the influence of foreign languages like English or French, but it is rejected by grammarians (and most educated people), and Spanish speakers don't use it in natural speech (unless they are making a conscious effort to mispronounce it as a dental).

    There is no dental sound for the v. In Spanish only the consontants d, t and f are dental (it touches the lips and the teeth). The z is inter-dental, but only in Spain. The m and the s can be slightly dental uncer certain circumstances.
     
    Last edited by a moderator:

    Anchel

    Senior Member
    Spanish (Spain)
    Honesty, I have never know the different pronounciation of both letters. I pronounce both as the same and I can't find any difference when I am listening to other people (spanish people). But I know that there are a difference (in theory) and maybe others can help us to understand it. In addition, I would like to know the difference in english.
     

    raulalgri

    Member
    Castellano Peruano - Peruvian Spanish
    Strictly speaking the V should be pronounced with a sound between a "B" and an "F" (like in French). The point is, in Spain nobody speaks like this and the most part of the people don't even know that. So, the sound of B and V is considered the same. However, I don't know if it is true for other countries.
    By the way, in Spain we call them “Be” and “Uve” or “be alta” and “be baja”. I’ve never heard “be larga” before.

    Bye!

    Aquí en el Perú las llamamos "be grande" y "ve chica", popularmente hablando, así como "be de burro (o de bueno)" y "ve de vaca". Unos pocos les dicen "be larga" y "ve corta". Normalmente no se escucha que las llamen “be alta” y “be baja”. Pero todos las reconocemos más o menos "oficialmente" como "be" y "uve". También las siguen reconociendo como "be labial" y "ve dentilabial", al menos algunos antiguos como yo, y me parece que muchos (de los que hay en esos lugares) en cierto(s) lugar(es) del país, donde aún siguen diferenciando los sonidos entre las dos consonantes y donde también diferencian entre los sonidos de la "y" y la "ll". Y ya que menciono esto de la "y" y de la "ll", particularmente yo no diferencio entre los sonidos de estos dos últimos; sin embargo, me da la impresión de que en el Uruguay sí diferencian: escuchen cantar al grupo uruguayo "Los Iracundos", aunque éstos, los uruguayos en general, así como los argentinos, pronuncian la "y" con un sonido muy cercano a la "ch".

    Pero, volviendo al tema de la "b" y la "v", los peruanos, como la mayoría de latinoamericanos, generalmente no diferencian los sonidos entre estas dos consonantes, aunque sí las pronuncian en forma diferenciada, como bilabial la "b" cuando va después de "m" y dentilabial la "v" cuando va después de "n", porque, de lo contrario, pronunciarían la "n" como "m" --o la "m" como "n"-- (lo que muchas veces sí sucede, sin embargo); pero el sonido es prácticamente el mismo. Le dan la misma importancia a la pronunciación dentilabial que a la bilabial, es decir, suena prácticamente igual, sin importar si una u otra la usan con la "b" o la "v", salvo algunos.
     
    Last edited:

    siempreaprendiendo

    Member
    SPAIN, SPANISH
    GMS said in another thread:



    Is this true in all Spanish-speaking countries? I ask because sometimes I think I hear a difference, depending on the speaker. An American of Cuban descent recently corrected me when I pronounced viniste as biniste, saying I should pronounce the V as the v in the English victory.

    Un saludo,
    Greg


    Don't you guys have that difference between b and v in english???
    Here in Spain, or at least in Madrid, there is no difference when pronouncing b and v, but i know that in some other places in Spain and Latinamerican they do..
     

    zumac

    Senior Member
    USA: English & Spanish
    .....
    Para comprobar que esto es cierto, basta tratar de encontrar dos palabras en castellano que difieran solo por la b o v en su "pronunciación". Estoy segura que existen, pero deben ser muy pocas porque no se me ocurre ninguna ...
    Entre estas están:
    bota y vota, también boto y voto
    baso y vaso
    baca y vaca
    etc.

    Saludos.
     

    luisinkc

    Member
    English - U.S./Spanish - Chile
    v. 1. Vigesimoquinta letra del abecedario español y vigesimosegunda del orden latino internacional. Su nombre es femenino: la uve. En América recibe también los nombres de ve, ve baja, ve corta o ve chica;su plural es uves o ves. La denominación más recomendable es uve, pues permite distinguir claramente el nombre de esta letra del de la letra b.

    2. Representa el sonido consonántico bilabial sonoro /b/, sonido que también representa la letra b (→ b) y, en ocasiones, la w (→ w, 2a).

    3. No existe en español diferencia alguna en la pronunciación de las letras b y v. Las dos representan hoy el sonido bilabial sonoro /b/. La ortografía española mantuvo por tradición ambas letras, que en latín representaban sonidos distintos. En el español medieval hay abundantes muestras de confusión entre una y otra grafía, prueba de su confluencia progresiva en la representación indistinta del mismo sonido, confluencia que era ya general en el siglo xvi. La pronunciación de la v como labiodental no ha existido nunca en español, y solo se da de forma espontánea en hablantes valencianos o mallorquines y en los de algunas zonas del sur de Cataluña, cuando hablan castellano, por influencia de su lengua regional. También se da espontáneamente en algunos puntos de América por influjo de las lenguas amerindias. En el resto de los casos, es un error que cometen algunas personas por un equivocado prurito de corrección, basado en recomendaciones del pasado, pues aunque la Academia reconoció ya desde el Diccionario de Autoridades (1726-1739) que «los españoles no hacemos distinción en la pronunciación de estas dos letras», varias ediciones de la Ortografía y de la Gramática académicas de los siglos xviii, xix y principios del xx describieron, e incluso recomendaron, la pronunciación de la v como labiodental. Se creyó entonces conveniente distinguirla de la b, como ocurría en varias de las grandes lenguas europeas, entre ellas el francés y el inglés, de tan notable influjo en esas épocas; pero ya desde la Gramática de 1911 la Academia dejó de recomendar explícitamente esta distinción. En resumen, la pronunciación correcta de la letra ven español es idéntica a la de la b, por lo que no existe oralmente ninguna diferencia en nuestro idioma entre palabras como baca y vaca, bello y vello, acerbo y acervo.

    Fuente/Source: Diccionario panhispánico de dudas http://lema.rae.es/dpd/srv/search?id=d45ahCOicD6TkHkns8
     

    Amapolas

    Senior Member
    Castellano rioplatense
    v. 1. Vigesimoquinta letra del abecedario español y vigesimosegunda del orden latino internacional. Su nombre es femenino: la uve. En América recibe también los nombres de ve, ve baja, ve corta o ve chica;su plural es uves o ves. La denominación más recomendable es uve, pues permite distinguir claramente el nombre de esta letra del de la letra b.

    2. Representa el sonido consonántico bilabial sonoro /b/, sonido que también representa la letra b (→ b) y, en ocasiones, la w (→ w, 2a).

    3. No existe en español diferencia alguna en la pronunciación de las letras b y v. Las dos representan hoy el sonido bilabial sonoro /b/. La ortografía española mantuvo por tradición ambas letras, que en latín representaban sonidos distintos. En el español medieval hay abundantes muestras de confusión entre una y otra grafía, prueba de su confluencia progresiva en la representación indistinta del mismo sonido, confluencia que era ya general en el siglo xvi. La pronunciación de la v como labiodental no ha existido nunca en español, y solo se da de forma espontánea en hablantes valencianos o mallorquines y en los de algunas zonas del sur de Cataluña, cuando hablan castellano, por influencia de su lengua regional. También se da espontáneamente en algunos puntos de América por influjo de las lenguas amerindias. En el resto de los casos, es un error que cometen algunas personas por un equivocado prurito de corrección, basado en recomendaciones del pasado, pues aunque la Academia reconoció ya desde el Diccionario de Autoridades (1726-1739) que «los españoles no hacemos distinción en la pronunciación de estas dos letras», varias ediciones de la Ortografía y de la Gramática académicas de los siglos xviii, xix y principios del xx describieron, e incluso recomendaron, la pronunciación de la v como labiodental. Se creyó entonces conveniente distinguirla de la b, como ocurría en varias de las grandes lenguas europeas, entre ellas el francés y el inglés, de tan notable influjo en esas épocas; pero ya desde la Gramática de 1911 la Academia dejó de recomendar explícitamente esta distinción. En resumen, la pronunciación correcta de la letra ven español es idéntica a la de la b, por lo que no existe oralmente ninguna diferencia en nuestro idioma entre palabras como baca y vaca, bello y vello, acerbo y acervo.

    Fuente/Source: Diccionario panhispánico de dudas http://lema.rae.es/dpd/srv/search?id=d45ahCOicD6TkHkns8
    :thumbsup::thumbsup::thumbsup::thumbsup::thumbsup::thumbsup::thumbsup:
    Nunca entendí por qué hay tantos hispanohablantes que insisten en que hay diferencia entre B y V cuando ellos mismos no la hacen al hablar, y hasta tienen dificultad en pronunciar el sonido labiodental /v/ cuando aprenden otras lenguas en donde sí se usa, como el inglés o el italiano.

    Sí es cierto que hay sonidos alófonos, que incluyen una articulación ¿plosiva se dice en español? dependiendo de los sonidos adyacentes. Por lo tanto, no sonarán igual la V en "una vaca" que en "un vaso". Pero esto es independiente de que sea V o B, ya que el sonido será el mismo para "un vaso" que para "un banco", lo mismo digo para "una vaca" y "una barra". Pero esto ya es otro tema. :)
     

    luisinkc

    Member
    English - U.S./Spanish - Chile
    :thumbsup::thumbsup::thumbsup::thumbsup::thumbsup::thumbsup::thumbsup:
    Nunca entendí por qué hay tantos hispanohablantes que insisten en que hay diferencia entre B y V cuando ellos mismos no la hacen al hablar, y hasta tienen dificultad en pronunciar el sonido labiodental /v/ cuando aprenden otras lenguas en donde sí se usa, como el inglés o el italiano.

    Sí es cierto que hay sonidos alófonos, que incluyen una articulación ¿plosiva se dice en español? dependiendo de los sonidos adyacentes. Por lo tanto, no sonarán igual la V en "una vaca" que en "un vaso". Pero esto es independiente de que sea V o B, ya que el sonido será el mismo para "un vaso" que para "un banco", lo mismo digo para "una vaca" y "una barra". Pero esto ya es otro tema. :)

    Puede ser plosiva o aproximante, pero depende del ámbito fonológico, no la ortografía. O sea, cuando la b/v se encuentra entre dos vocales, se convierte en aproximante, es decir, no hay un cierre total de los labios. Creo que por eso muchos piensan que la consonante labiodental existe en español: detectan el sonido más suave de la aproximante y si saben algo del inglés piensan que tiene algo que ver con la “v” labiodental. La otra posibilidad es que durante la primera mitad del siglo XX, algunas escuelas primarias distinguían entre “b labial” y “v dental” como herramienta pedagógica para enseñar ortografía, pero era eso no más— una manera de enseñar ortografía a los niños y nada más.

    Un detalle más: de vez en cuando, se produce una “v” labiodental en ciertas palabras, como “envuelto” por ejemplo. Muchos hablantes, cuando pronuncian la “n”, cierran los labios en anticipación de la “v”, así que la “n” sale como una “m” labiodental, y por supuesto, ahí sale una verdadera “v” también. También en Chile, algunos linguistas han documentado casos de hablantes que usan una “v” labiodental, pero no tiene nada que ver con ortografía: la mayoría del tiempo se les sale una “v” cuando ortográficamente es una “b”.
     

    TheCrociato91

    Senior Member
    Italian - Northern Italy
    Un detalle más: de vez en cuando, se produce una “v” labiodental en ciertas palabras, como “envuelto” por ejemplo. Muchos hablantes, cuando pronuncian la “n”, cierran los labios en anticipación de la “v”, así que la “n” sale como una “m” labiodental, y por supuesto, ahí sale una verdadera “v” también.

    Eso no me suena. De lo que aprendí, esa "n" se pronuncía sí como una /m/, pero justamente por pronunciarse de esa forma, lo que sigue es una /b/ oclusiva [ b ] pura y dura, y no una aproximante [ β̞ ] (y por tanto tampoco una /v/*). La /v/, de hecho, no se pronuncia con los labios cerrados (mientras que la /b/ bilabial sí se pronuncia con los labios cerrados), con lo cual no le veo mucho sentido a que uno cierre los labios al pronunciar la "m" "en anticipación de la “v"".

    * Con esto claramente no pretendo decir que /v/ no exista del todo. Por ejemplo, aquí se dice lo siguiente:
    • Es destacable mencionar que hay algunos hispanohablantes que diferencian entre b /b/ y v /v/ aunque no sea normativo para la Real Academia Española y el castellano estándar. Esto es debido al conocimiento de la existencia del sonido /v/ (quizás por conocer otra lengua donde exista tal sonido), sumado a la vacilación del uso correcto de b y v en la ortografía del español. En España sólo se distinguen estos sonidos en la variedad del castellano en territorios catalanófonos, y en el castellano churro, hablado en zonas del interior de la provincia de Valencia; vaca [ˈva̠ka̠] y baca [ˈba̠ka̠]. Tal distinción no es reconocida por la Real Academia Española, ni es realizada por la mayoría de hablantes del español (salvo aquéllos que puedan ser instruidos con esta diferenciación); vaca [ˈba̠ka̠] y baca [ˈba̠ka̠].
     
    Last edited:

    Amapolas

    Senior Member
    Castellano rioplatense
    Eso no me suena. De lo que aprendí, esa "n" se pronuncía sí como una /m/, pero justamente por pronunciarse de esa forma, lo que sigue es una /b/ oclusiva [ b ] pura y dura, y no una aproximante [ β̞ ] (y por tanto tampoco una /v/*).
    Esa es también mi experiencia.

    Además, cuando he tenido conversaciones sobre este tema, mucha gente me ha dicho que hay diferencia entre B y V, y que ellos pronuncian claramente la V (refiriéndose al sonido labiodental), pero están equivocados: creen que es así, porque la grafía influye en la idea que tienen de cómo pronuncian, pero si los oís hablar no usan jamás el sonido labiodental. :)
     

    duvija

    Senior Member
    Spanish - Uruguay
    Si, el español ya hace siglos que no diferencia. En la ortografía hay que recordar que 'm' va antes de 'b' y 'n' antes de 'v'. (Esto último solemos no estudiarlo en la escuela pero es así)
     

    Isabel Sewell

    Banned
    Spanish
    Greg
    GMS said in another thread:



    Is this true in all Spanish-speaking countries? I ask because sometimes I think I hear a difference, depending on the speaker. An American of Cuban descent recently corrected me when I pronounced viniste as biniste, saying I should pronounce the V as the v in the English victory.

    Hola Greg
    It could be that the silly Cuban was giving you a hard time :)I am Cuban:)
    Most Spanish speakers around the world tend to pronounce both Vaca and Burro with Bible 'B' sound. Granted, Vaca "should" be pronounced with the Victory 'V' sound. Writing does requires the proper consonant, though.
    Isabel
     

    Isabel Sewell

    Banned
    Spanish
    "Vaca" is an example.
    "V as in Victory" provides an actual sound for speakers of English as a native language.
    Any "V" in Spanish should properly sound like the "V in victory" - but most people just pronounce BACA and BICTORIA and BOLBEMOS (volvemos). The phonetic has deteriorated.

    In elementary school, children learn to read (phonetically) by saying "B as in burro" and "V as in vaca".

    Hope it helps
     
    Last edited:
    Top