buff up [muscles, etc]

Ume

Banned
Japanese
Hello.

The Longman Dictionary says that "buff up" means "to exercise in order to make your muscles bigger."
- Smith buffed up for his role as Muhammad Ali.

Would it be also OK to say "Smith got buffed up for his role as Muhammad Ali"?
 
  • Ume

    Banned
    Japanese
    Dimcl,
    Thank you for the comment.

    How about these?
    - Smith buffed out for his role as Muhammad Ali.
    - Smith got buffed out for his role as Muhammad Ali.

    I don't think that they sound okay.
     

    Dimcl

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    Dimcl,
    Thank you for the comment.

    How about these?
    - Smith buffed out for his role as Muhammad Ali.
    - Smith got buffed out for his role as Muhammad Ali.

    I don't think that they sound okay.
    No, "buffed up" is the colloquialism, not "buffed out". Think of the verb "buff". One "buffs" one's shoes to make them shiny. One "buffs up" one's body to make it shiny (so to speak). It's simply the accepted phrase and "buff out" is not.
     

    panjandrum

    Occasional Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    Buff up, is a bit like polish up, but with more figurative uses.
    Generally meaning to finish off or to improve (this example refers to a table):
    Then simply buff up with furniture polish or wax ...

    You could buff up your language skills before going on holiday.

    And now you can also buff up (intransitive) before going on holiday.
    I wonder if this has any association with improving how well you look "in the buff" :)
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top