bugger off

  • se16teddy

    Senior Member
    English - England
    #9
    I think that 'bugger' is not quite as taboo as 'fuck'. 'Buggery' was a term of criminal law referring to anal intercourse (homosexual, heterosexual or bestial), but unlike 'fuck' its origin was clearly euphemistic rather than explicit.
     

    cirrus

    Senior Member
    UK English
    #10
    I am there with se16teddy. Bugger is used daily both here and in Oz and NZ. Its meaning has drifted from buggery and it is almost like saying damn: You drop your pen when you are taking a phone message and say "oh bugger".
     

    Tatzingo

    Senior Member
    English, UK
    #11
    se16teddy said:
    I think that 'bugger' is not quite as taboo as 'fuck'. 'Buggery' was a term of criminal law referring to anal intercourse (homosexual, heterosexual or bestial), but unlike 'fuck' its origin was clearly euphemistic rather than explicit.
    I agree, although I don't believe that either "F*** off" or "Bugger off" should be taken literally. They are merely used as crude but effective ways of telling someone to "go away."

    Tatz.
     

    scagnetta

    New Member
    Uruguay Spanish
    #12
    Thanks to you all. I'm trying to translate some dialogues, so I will probably come back with another question. At last, I decided that "vete a la mierda" is the most exact meaning into the general context.
    Once again, thanks!
     

    Bucanero

    Senior Member
    Spain
    #13
    Would it be right then to use the expression in this sentence? I plan to bugger off to the Amazon. I mean, without any kind of despective meaning, just saying I plan to dissappear into the jungle...
     
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