bugger (to do bugger all)

Discussion in 'Spanish-English Vocabulary / Vocabulario Español-Inglés' started by motorin, Dec 11, 2008.

  1. motorin Member

    Spain/Spanish
    Hello, everybody!

    I have just read: "I also have finished classes but still have to do that f** essay and I HAVE DONE BUGGER ALL DAY. Oh, deary me".

    I would like to know how to translate that bugger in there. I saw it means hijo de puta, so in Spanish it would make sense: "Hacer el hijo de puta". But I would like to be sure. It was said by a Scott, just in case that is relevant.

    Thanks a lot.
    Motorin
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 22, 2014
  2. bertie Senior Member

    Alicante
    English-England
    Hola,
    It means simply that "he has done nothing at all during the day".

    To do bugger all = to do nothing at all.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 22, 2014
  3. sound shift

    sound shift Senior Member

    Derby (central England)
    English - England
    I agree with you, bertie, but it should be said that the original sentence - "I have done bugger all day" - makes no sense, because "all" belongs with "bugger", not with "day".

    En cambio, "I've done bugger all today", "I did bugger all yesterday", etcétera, sí que tienen sentido.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 22, 2014
  4. Masood

    Masood Senior Member

    Leicester, England
    British English
    Agreed.
    Alternatively, the writer might've forgotten to write the second 'all' and had meant to write: "I have done bugger all all day".

    Easy enough a mistake to make, I'd say.
     
  5. yomemoims

    yomemoims Senior Member

    Madrid
    Spanish - Spain
    and what do you understand if I say: the policemen would park their jeep here when they came to bugger someone in the village.

    Does it mean to do nothing, to bother someone or to fuck someone?
     
  6. sound shift

    sound shift Senior Member

    Derby (central England)
    English - England
    Out of context, I would say it means the third of your options.
     
  7. Masood

    Masood Senior Member

    Leicester, England
    British English
    Depende mucho del contexto.
    ¿Te importaría explicarnos lo que sucedió?
     
  8. yomemoims

    yomemoims Senior Member

    Madrid
    Spanish - Spain
    The narrator is describing his village and in the center of the village there is a tea shop. there, the policemen park their jeeps and then it comes the sentence given... that's all the context I've got... sorry
     
  9. Masood

    Masood Senior Member

    Leicester, England
    British English
    ¿En qué país está el pueblo?
     
  10. Bevj

    Bevj Allegra Moderata

    Girona, Spain
    English (U.K.)
    Are you sure that this is a correct quote, yomemoims? :eek:
     
  11. yomemoims

    yomemoims Senior Member

    Madrid
    Spanish - Spain
    It's in India, and yes I'm sure that it's the correct quote.
     
  12. Masood

    Masood Senior Member

    Leicester, England
    British English
    ¿En qué época está ambientada?
     
  13. yomemoims

    yomemoims Senior Member

    Madrid
    Spanish - Spain
    In 1957, more or less
     
  14. Bevj

    Bevj Allegra Moderata

    Girona, Spain
    English (U.K.)
    'To bugger' per se is quite different from 'to do bugger all'.
    To bugger means to sodomise, so if policemen went to a village to bugger someone, they went there to have anal sex with that person.
    A rather nasty situation....
     
  15. Masood

    Masood Senior Member

    Leicester, England
    British English
    If you're sure about the quote, then I agree with Bevj.
     
  16. yomemoims

    yomemoims Senior Member

    Madrid
    Spanish - Spain
    ok, thank you all
     
  17. ORL Senior Member

    Spanish/Argentina
    Por aquí se diría "hice sebo/huevo todo el día"
     
  18. spodulike

    spodulike Senior Member

    Brighton, England
    English - England
    There is another possibility. Maybe English usage is different in India. For example ...

    "to be pissed" means to be drunk in British English and "to be annoyed" in American English

    Maybe the policemen are parking badly to inconvenience the villagers?
     
  19. spodulike

    spodulike Senior Member

    Brighton, England
    English - England
    You need "ALL" twice.

    "damn all"
    "fuck all"
    "sod all"
    "bugger all"

    All of the above expressions mean "nothing"

    "... and I HAVE DONE NOTHING ALL DAY. Oh deary me"
     
  20. yomemoims

    yomemoims Senior Member

    Madrid
    Spanish - Spain

    The text says nothing more about the police, that's all I have.
     
  21. cirrus

    cirrus Senior Member

    Crug Hywel
    UK English
    I think it's unlikely the police would come to bugger someone but they might come to bugger someone about. Buggering someone about means making their life difficult.
     
  22. mijoch Banned

    British English
    In different versions of English, the use of prepositions and phrasal verbs can vary.

    I don't have specific knowledge of Indian English.

    "to bugger up"------estropear, molestar, incordiar.

    M.
     
  23. sabretoof

    sabretoof Senior Member

    English - Australia
    This could easily be some kind of a metaphor of that too, given many people consider what the police do (to them) is unpleasant.

    But I suspect it is meant to be "to bugger up" = "to mess up" = "to ruin".
     
  24. yomemoims

    yomemoims Senior Member

    Madrid
    Spanish - Spain
    So, the most correct translation would be 'joder' because maybe they want to have sex and they also 'bugger up'. 'Joder' keeps both meanings, don't you think so?
     
  25. Suej

    Suej Member

    Rioplatense Spanish(tinyurl.com/y8dt94c)
    Maybe a little late (four years late) but I think in this case it's just a figure of speech. Yes, literally, "to bugger" means "to sodomise", but it's obvious that is not what is meant.

    For instance, "to be fucked (up)" doesn't mean to be literally fucked, but to be screwed. I think those policemen were just fucking someone up, making their lives miserable or sth similar.

    That is, of course, from the narrator's point of view. They could just be doing their job, which from the receiving hand can be considered somthing really nasty. As said by sabretoof, "given many people consider what the police do (to them) is unpleasant"


    Yes and no. "Joder" means (literally) to fuck just in some countries (like Spain and some Latin American countries), but in other places (such as Argentina and Uruguay) it doesn't. So it really depends on who the translation is aimed for.

    Anyway, I think the sexual connotation is neither needed nor intended. It is truly unlikely for policemen to be raping people in the middle of an Indian town during late 50s. IMHO, the author used "bugger" to express the narrator's dislike for police officers and their job.

    In Rioplatense Spanish, I'd translate it as "acá es donde se estaciona la policía cuando viene a joder/romperle las pelotas/cagar a alguien del pueblo."
    In European Spanish, "aquí es donde estaciona la policía cuando viene a joder/tocarle los cojones a alguien del pueblo."
    And so on and so forth.
     
    Last edited: Jul 24, 2013
  26. ProfeAmanda Member

    English - US
    This is an interesting thread. As a native English speaker from the US this is all new to me. I've only heard "Oh, bugger off" or calling someone a "bugger." I've would have never known the other phrases existed or what they meant.
     

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