build a team of talents in/on/at precision cancer medicine

thetazuo

Senior Member
Chinese - China
Meanwhile, in order to promote the exchange between young scholars, build a team of talents in/on/at precision cancer medicine, and carry forward the academic development, the youth group of Specialty Committee of Cancer Precision Medicine of WFCMS is due to be founded at the same time.

Hi. This is a translation from a text in Chinese by me. Which preposition is appropriate here after “talents”? At, on, or in?
Thank you for your opinions.
 
  • Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    If you want a single word, "in" seems the best choice.

    (I'm not very comfortable with using the word "talent" to mean "talented person", not in that sentence at least.)
     

    thetazuo

    Senior Member
    Chinese - China
    Thank you both. So do you think it’s better to say “build a team of cancer precision medicine talented people”?
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    Your revised sentence is worse. What do you mean by "talents" in your original sentence? And what do you mean by talented people? A talented physician might be an expert in treating cancer, but he wouldn't be called a cancer medicine talented person.

    In your original, I agree that "in" is the appropriate preposition.
     

    thetazuo

    Senior Member
    Chinese - China
    What do you mean by "talents" in your original sentence? And what do you mean by talented people? A talented physician might be an expert in treating cancer, but he wouldn't be called a cancer medicine talented person.
    Thank you also. I’m not even entirely sure what the corresponding original Chinese expression means, which I’ve just translated as is.
    Does the expression “construction of talent echelon” ring a bell with you?
    If it does, then is it OK to say “promote the construction of talent echelon in cancer precision medicine”? Or can I use “at” or “on” as in “promote the construction of talent echelon at/on cancer precision medicine”?
     

    Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    I’m not even entirely sure what the corresponding original Chinese expression means,
    I've heard the word "talent" used to mean "qualified person" or "expert" depending on context. I believe it's common in Singapore and other places in south-east Asia, where "foreign talent" is a term used to refer to expatriate professionals.

    I understand "build a team of talents in precision cancer medicine" as "build a team of specialists/qualified and knowledgeable people in the field of precision cancer medicine".

    Does the expression “construction of talent echelon” ring a bell with you?
    No.

    is it OK to say “promote the construction of talent echelon in cancer precision medicine”?
    What do you mean by echelon here?
     

    thetazuo

    Senior Member
    Chinese - China
    I've heard the word "talent" used to mean "qualified person" or "expert" depending on context. I believe it's common in Singapore and other places in south-east Asia, where "foreign talent" is a term used to refer to expatriate professionals.
    Thank you again. But “experts” is not what the original text says. Are there any other synonyms for “talented people”?
    What do you mean by echelon here?
    Just a fancy word for “team”.
     

    DonnyB

    Sixties Mod
    English UK Southern Standard English
    Thank you also. I’m not even entirely sure what the corresponding original Chinese expression means, which I’ve just translated as is.
    Does the expression “construction of talent echelon” ring a bell with you?
    If it does, then is it OK to say “promote the construction of talent echelon in cancer precision medicine”? Or can I use “at” or “on” as in “promote the construction of talent echelon at/on cancer precision medicine”?
    I'm afraid none of that really works for me.

    I think if I were you I'd try posting the original text in the Chinese forum, and asking for help with a translation. :idea:
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    Yes, the whole structure really doesn't work in English. You need grammar changes first, before worrying about specific vocabulary.
     
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