Bulgarian: турското робство

sotos

Senior Member
Greek
Hello everybody. I don't speak any Bulgarian or other slavic language, but i found this expression (турското робство) as equivalent to the Greek "Turkocracy", refering to the Ottoman occupation (15th to 19th c.).
Is this term commonly used in Bulgarian (or other language) in the context of the Ottoman period? If not, what is the term used?
Thank you.
 
  • Panceltic

    Senior Member
    Slovenščina
    Well, иго doesn't come from ζυγόv; rather, they are cognates and both come from an earlier Proto-Indo-European word. :)

    Plurals with -es- sound really cool. In Slovenian, they are still actively used.
     

    Ben Jamin

    Senior Member
    Polish
    турското иго (Turkish yoke) is also used
    Hello everybody. I don't speak any Bulgarian or other slavic language, but i found this expression (турското робство) as equivalent to the Greek "Turkocracy", refering to the Ottoman occupation (15th to 19th c.).
    Is this term commonly used in Bulgarian (or other language) in the context of the Ottoman period? If not, what is the term used?
    Thank you.
    But "робство" means "slavery", while "-cracy" means just "rule".
     

    ilocas2

    Banned
    Czech
    For the clarification, I don't speak Bulgarian and I don't know what terms are used. The thing is that I got an idea that "yoke" could be also used by analogy with Czech and I checked it on Google that it's used. The question in the first post is still not answered.
     

    Liz Keen

    New Member
    Bulgarian - Bulgaria
    The question in the first post is still not answered.
    Yes, we say "Турско робство" when we speak about the Ottoman occupation. "Османско владичество/иго" is mainly used in textbooks.
     

    sotos

    Senior Member
    Greek
    But "робство" means "slavery", while "-cracy" means just "rule".
    Yes, I understand that "yoke" is not exactly equivalent to "-cracy", but maybe in bulgarian there isn't a mot-a-mot for "turkocracy". For the first we also use in greek the "turkikos zygos" when we want to put some sentiment in, while "turkocracy" is rather neutral. However, due to some kind of political correctness, today many authors prefer the even more neutral "Ottoman period".
     

    DarkChild

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian
    Турско робство is the most widely used term. It means literally Turkish slavery. In recent years, some PC elements have proposed to eliminate this term and use the rather ridiculous Османско присъствие which means Ottoman presence. This created the opposite effect.

    Турско иго is another very common term, but it sounds more academic and formal, at least to my ears.
     

    sotos

    Senior Member
    Greek
    Thanks DarkChild. I suppose the linguo-political correctness is not entirely off-topic in this forum, is it? It has to do with the words' meanings, and the meanings of the meanings.
     
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