Bump and jack

Paulfromitaly

MODerator
Italian
Hello,

This is an excerpt from a long document about defensive uses of firearms.
http://www.recguns.com/Sources/VI.backup.html

For instance, an attacker might be upon you before you can fire your weapon. In such a case, were your weapon already drawn but unaimed, you would not wish to bring the weapon up to eye level and extended out to arm's length, exposing it to a grapple. In such a situation you would prefer to keep the weapon low and close to the body where an attacker will have less chance of taking, or possibly even seeing the weapon. Another case might be a situation in which you fire from a non-standing position; for instance, let us imagine hypothetically, that you are the target of a "bump and jack" car-jacking.

What does "bump and jack" exactly mean?
Does it mean that the thugs beat up the driver and then steal his car?
Is it AmE slang?

Thank you
 
  • teksch

    Senior Member
    English - American
    While I haven't heard this phrase before, it makes sense to me. The attacker hits your car with his car. Once you stop your car, the attacker will attempt to force you to get out and he will take your car.
     

    xqby

    Senior Member
    English (U.S.)
    This is not a common phrase. Google gives me two hits for "'bump and jack' carjacking": one of the links is broken, and the other is your article.

    That said, I understand it as:
    1) A driver runs into your car (bump)
    2) You and he get out of your respective cars to assess the damage
    3) He steals your car while you are unable to drive away (jack)

    I'm not sure why this would involve firing a gun from a non-standing position.
     

    Paulfromitaly

    MODerator
    Italian
    Thank you guys.
    3) He steals your car while you are unable to drive away (jack)
    So should the correct term be "hijack" rather than "jack"?
    I assume there must always be at least two vehicles involved in a "bump and jack", that is the attackers don't approach the victim's car on foot, correct?
     
    Last edited:

    Nunty

    Modified
    Hebrew-US English (bilingual)
    "Jack" is commonly used by cops-and-robbers types to mean any kind of major theft. "Bump and jack" has a nice ring to it; I don't think it should be carjack or hijack.
     

    liliput

    Senior Member
    U.K. English
    I'm not sure why this would involve firing a gun from a non-standing position.
    Presumably a wily victim might stay in their car and await the attacker with a weapon drawn.


    I've not come across "bump and jack" but it seems easy enough to understand within the context.
     
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