bump /bump against /bump into

stephenlearner

Senior Member
Chinese
Hi,

The WR dictionary shows that bump can work in different ways.

The car bumped a truck.

The car bumped against a tree.
She bumped into me. (not meet by accident)
I bumped my arm.

I wonder how they differ from each other.
 
  • stephenlearner

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    Thank you.
    If I use just one expression consistently in four sentences, does it work? Like these:

    The car bumped a truck.
    The car bumped a tree.
    She bumped me. (not meet by accident)
    I bumped my arm.

    The car bumped against a truck.
    The car bumped against a tree.
    She bumped against me. (not meet by accident)
    I bumped against my arm. (this does not work)

    The car bumped into a truck.
    The car bumped into a tree.
    She bumped into me. (not meet by accident)
    I bumped into my arm. (does not work)


     

    stephenlearner

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    <-----Threads have been merged at this point.----->

    Hi,

    Are the three sentences all OK?
    The car bumped a truck,
    The car bumped into a truck,
    The car bumped against a truck.

    If they are all fine, what are their differences?

    Thank you.
     
    Last edited by a moderator:

    Florentia52

    Modwoman in the attic
    English - United States
    I presume you're asking whether "bumped," "bumped into," or "bumped against" is correct in your sentence. As always, we need some context in order to be able to help you. What are you trying to say? What is happening in the situation? And which version (or versions) do you think is/are correct?
     

    stephenlearner

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    I have seen the WR dictionary and found BUMP, BUMP AGAINST, and BUMP INTO all work in different sentences. I am confused. I can't distinguish their differences, because they don't provide contexts.

    I assume that:

    1. bump against means the car and the truck has run in the opposite direction before they collide.
    2. bump into means the car and the truck has run in the same direction, but the car driver has made a mistake and run into the truck.
    3. bump means the there is a gentle touch between the car and the truck.
     

    Florentia52

    Modwoman in the attic
    English - United States
    "Bump against" means the car and the truck has run in the opposite direction before they collide.

    No; there is no indication in "The car bumped against the truck" that the truck was moving at all, let alone in which direction.



    "Bump into" means the car and the truck has run in the same direction, but the car driver has made a mistake and run into the truck.

    Again, no; we don't know which direction the vehicles were moving, or whether the truck was moving at all, or whether the bumping happened by accident or on purpose.


    "Bump" means the there is a gentle touch between the car and the truck.

    That is correct. And, as you were told in #2, that's what "bump into" and "bump against" also mean.




     

    aleaf

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    The boys bumped into each other at the corridor and got injured.
    The boys bumped against each other at the corridor and got injured.

    My bilingual dictionary mentions that against implies stronger impact than into when used with bump. Is that true in most cases?
     
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    DonnyB

    Sixties Mod
    English UK Southern Standard English
    The boys bumped into each other at the corridor and got injured.
    The boys bumped against each other at the corridor and got injured.

    My bilingual dictionary mentions that against implies stronger impact than into when used with bump. Is that true in most cases?
    I'm not sure that it is true: it depends on the situation being described.

    I will say that "The boys bumped against each other..." sounds odd: it would work with boys bumping against something (an object) but I don't think it does with each other.

    And it also suggests to me a glancing blow, whereas they must have done it with some force to get injured.
     

    Chitra1980

    Member
    India-Hindi and English
    I'm not sure that it is true: it depends on the situation being described.

    I will say that "The boys bumped against each other..." sounds odd: it would work with boys bumping against something (an object) but I don't think it does with each other.

    And it also suggests to me a glancing blow, whereas they must have done it with some force to get injured.
    Is it correct to say "the two boys bumped into each-other"?
     
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