bungalow

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Einstein

Senior Member
UK, English
I often see the English word bungalow translated into Italian as precisely bungalow (also in the WR Dictionary). This is not right, because the word has different meanings in the two languages: in English it is a normal house with one floor (no stairs), while in Italian it is a place where you can stay on holiday/vacation. We need an Italian translation of the English term and a definition of the Italian term with an English translation. Any suggestions?
The English bungalow could be translated as "villetta ad un solo piano", but it seems rather long.

A note about pronunciation: it is bun (rhyming with fun) - ga - low (like low=basso) and is derived from the Indian city of Bangalore.
 
  • ivyity

    Member
    Italian
    Hi*
    Really, there is no translation for this term: in Italian we say "bungalow", referring to a small home with no stairs, usually situated in a camping or resort. (I have a bungalow in Sicily*it's my holiday home). The translation "villetta ad un solo piano" isn't right, because the bungalow is very different from villetta*
    Bye*ivy
     

    london calling

    Senior Member
    UK English
    Hello!
    Maybe we could translate the Italian "bungalow" or holiday home as chalet(which is in turn a "bad" English version of the Swiss-French word :D)!

    You'd find those in holiday-camps in GB.....
     

    Paulfromitaly

    MODerator
    Italian
    Hello!
    Maybe we could translate the Italian "bungalow" or holiday home as chalet(which is in turn a "bad" English version of the Swiss-French word :D)!

    You'd find those in holiday-camps in GB.....
    To me bungalow has a slightly negative nuance, however: a house with cheap furniture, bad finish, not very good windows and doors, thin walls, a place you're fine to live in for no more than few weeks.
     

    london calling

    Senior Member
    UK English
    To me bungalow has a slightly negative nuance, however: a house with cheap furniture, bad finish, not very good windows and doors, thin walls, a place you're fine to live in for no more than few weeks.
    Paul
    You've just described a chalet in a holiday-camp in GB!:D

    That's precisely why I said we use a "bad" version of chalet in English! (I must however admit that when we say Swiss Chalet in English we generally mean something rather up-market).
     

    Einstein

    Senior Member
    UK, English
    Thanks! Londoncalling confirms my suspicion that for the Italian "bungalow" chalet is the usual word in English, which doesn't mean the Swiss chalet!

    I still think "villetta ad un solo piano" is a bit long. It's OK for a precise description, but if there is a passing reference to it in a book, where the number of floors isn't really important, wouldn't "casetta bassa" be sufficient...?
     

    Paulfromitaly

    MODerator
    Italian
    Thanks! Londoncalling confirms my suspicion that for the Italian "bungalow" chalet is the usual word in English, which doesn't mean the Swiss chalet!

    I still think "villetta ad un solo piano" is a bit long. It's OK for a precise description, but if there is a passing reference to it in a book, where the number of floors isn't really important, wouldn't "casetta bassa" be sufficient...?
    Villetta rather than casetta.
     

    Paulfromitaly

    MODerator
    Italian
    How funny we (Italians) are!
    We use an English word which seems to have a different connotation in AE and in BE (now I'm curious to know what our friends from down under have to say in this regard), but we ignore the real meaning of it, if not for the fact it refers to some kind of "house"..
     

    Memimao

    Senior Member
    United Kingdom English
    How funny we (Italians) are!
    We use an English word which seems to have a different connotation in AE and in BE (now I'm curious to know what our friends from down under have to say in this regard), but we ignore don't know its the real meaning of it, if not for the fact it refers to some kind of "house"..
    Personally, as even in English it's a borrowed word, the borrower can make the use they want of it. I do not belong to the category of people who feel that an English word in Italian should mean the same as it does/did in English.

    The English were never so scrupulous with Latin:D:D
     

    Paulfromitaly

    MODerator
    Italian
    Personally, as even in English it's a borrowed word, the borrower can make the use they want of it. I do not belong to the category of people who feel that an English word in Italian should mean the same as it does/did in English.

    The English were never so scrupulous with Latin:D:D
    Don't you think that's quite misleading? (just like :warn::warn:fanny in AE and BE :D:D)
     

    Memimao

    Senior Member
    United Kingdom English
    Don't you think that's quite misleading? (just like :warn::warn:fanny in AE and BE :D:D)
    There was a song in the 1930s -Let's call the whole thing off which sang of the BE/AE differences.

    We live with it, because we see US television without dubbing or subtitles:D:D

    But you're right, Cicero would crease up laughing at our use of his tongue:D
     

    ivyity

    Member
    Italian
    I read the answers to your question and I'm not agree. I think that the term "villetta ad un piano" is absolutely incorrect; It's better "casetta ad un piano". At the same time, also "Chalet" it's not appropriate, because in Italy we use this term exclusively for small home situated in mountain, with generally two stairs. I'm not agree, besides, that the bungalow has cheap furniture or not very good windows and doors (my bungalow in Sicily - that all my family call simply bungalow*- has very expensive furniture, as well as windows and doors!). Thecnically, bungalow's peculiarity is its lack of foundations and its prefabricated structure, that not allow the use of reinforced concrete: this is the real difference between a "casa-casetta-villetta" and a bungalow! Regarding the right translation, I think that the better term is "alloggio di piccole dimensioni" and the definition is "oval prefabricate lodging".
    I hope I have been useful*
    Ivy
     

    Paulfromitaly

    MODerator
    Italian
    I read the answers to your question and I'm not agree. I think that the term "villetta ad un piano" is absolutely incorrect; It's better "casetta ad un piano". At the same time, also "Chalet" it's not appropriate, because in Italy we use this term exclusively for small home situated in mountain, with generally two stairs. I'm not agree, besides, that the bungalow has cheap furniture or not very good windows and doors (my bungalow in Sicily - that all my family call simply bungalow*- has very expensive furniture, as well as windows and doors!). Thecnically, bungalow's peculiarity is its lack of foundations and its prefabricated structure, that not allow the use of reinforced concrete: this is the real difference between a "casa-casetta-villetta" and a bungalow! Regarding the right translation, I think that the better term is "alloggio di piccole dimensioni" and the definition is "oval prefabricate lodging".
    I hope I have been useful*
    Ivy
    Leggi con attenzione quello che Einstein e gli altri che hanno partecipato a questo thread hanno scritto: nessuno ha fatto confusione tra i vari tipi di abitazione, il problema è che in italiano usiamo il termine bungalow in maniera che non corrisponde al significato del termine in inglese.
     

    london calling

    Senior Member
    UK English
    Hello, Ivy!

    From your description of your holiday home, I'm sure that if I saw it I would call it a bungalow (in English!).

    Just for your info: a chalet in a holiday camp, for us Brits, is a cheaply-furnished pre-fab building for short stays. A Swiss Chalet is a very nice, up-market place up in the mountains somewhere.....
     

    takashimiike

    Senior Member
    italian
    Ritiro fuori questo vecchio post solo per dire che nel testo che sto traducendo (romanzo americano contemporaneo), il protagonista vive "in a bungalow". che è una casa estremamente elegante a due piani!
     

    theartichoke

    Senior Member
    English - Canada
    Ritiro fuori questo vecchio post solo per dire che nel testo che sto traducendo (romanzo americano contemporaneo), il protagonista vive "in a bungalow". che è una casa estremamente elegante a due piani!
    Ah, but how long are the stairs between the two floors? Perhaps it's a "split-level bungalow," where there are only about 4 or 5 steps between the floors. My aunt lives in one, built in the early 1960s: you go up about 4 steps to get from the living room area to the area with the bedrooms and bathrooms, whereas my own 2-storey house has 14 steps to go up to the second floor.
     
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