Buried with/by

< Previous | Next >

ayed

Senior Member
Arabic(Saudi)
Hello, folks. I hope you are all very well.
What is the difference between the two:

1.There is a hoard buried with a layer of sand. (the process of burial was done by man)
2.There is a hoard buried by a layer of sand. (the process of burial was done by wind, animal, tractor...)

I hope my expectations are correct


Thank you in advance.
 
  • suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    Hi, I don't think your distinction is always valid. I don't think we have a way to make a difference between man and nature in this context, though if you are trying to suggest a deliberate attempt to hide something "burried with" could work in the same as "the wall was covered with paint".

    However, if I read "buried with" I would expect the next thing to be an item that had been buried alongside the hoard, not the substance used to bury it.
    I would use "buried by sand" regardless of the agent of the burying.

    This is an interesting question and it has made me think about other examples.
     

    ayed

    Senior Member
    Arabic(Saudi)
    Hi, I don't think your distinction is always valid. I don't think we have a way to make a difference between man and nature in this context, though if you are trying to suggest a deliberate attempt to hide something "burried with" could work in the same as "the wall was covered with paint".

    However, if I read "buried with" I would expect the next thing to be an item that had been buried alongside the hoard, not the substance used to bury it.
    I would use "buried by sand" regardless of the agent of the burying.

    This is an interesting question and it has made me think about other examples.
    Thanks a lot for your quick response!
    What I have got yet is that the preposition with implies accompaniment, as the preposition by implies or asks to be followed by agent "a doer". I hope I am not off track.
     

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    Yes, in general I think with suggest an accompaniment (although, as usual with English it doesn't always!!) certainly in the collocation "buried with a noun".
    You could be buried with an official ceremony, which would be different.

    Buried by does suggest an agent, whether human or natural.

    What has started you on this enquiry?
     

    ayed

    Senior Member
    Arabic(Saudi)
    What has started you on this enquiry
    Only to know of the difference between the two as I have been struggling to know more of the prepositional usage and how to employ them correctly.

    < I edited this to correct the quotation formatting. Cagey, moderator. >
     
    Last edited by a moderator:

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    , What has started you on this enquiry
    Only to know of the difference between the two as I have been struggling to know more of the prepositional usage and how to employ them correctly.
    Ah, such a challenge. I think sometimes it is very clear what we use in any context, and sometimes it really is not! Good luck with it.

    Suze


    < I edited this to correct the quotation formatting. Cagey, moderator. >
     
    Last edited by a moderator:

    ayed

    Senior Member
    Arabic(Saudi)
    To the best of my knowledge, the famous linguist ,Chomsky, has classified prepositions in three categories :
    Prepositions lexically determined
    prepositions semantically determined..
    The third didn't cross my mind:eek:
     

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    To the best of my knowledge, the famous linguist ,Chomsky, has classified prepositions in three categories :
    Prepositions lexically determined
    prepositions semantically determined..
    The third didn't cross my mind:eek:
    That third one is the most common. ;):)
     

    london calling

    Senior Member
    UK English
    Just to confuse matters. :(If we change the sentences to the active form we get:

    The/a man buried the hoard with/under a layer of sand
    The wind buried the hoard under a layer of sand.


    I wouldn't use 'by' in either sentence (unless I were to add 'by using a shovel' to the first sentence, where 'by' means 'by means of').

    Edit. Whoops! Yes FQ, of course.
     
    Last edited:

    Language Hound

    Senior Member
    American English
    1.There is a hoard buried with a layer of sand. (the process of burial was done by man)
    I would use "under" here and rephrase it as I don't find your sentence, even if we substitute "under" for "with," very natural sounding.
    ===>John buried the hoard under the sand.

    The hoard (of what?) would have to be a hoard of small or thin objects or the layer of sand would have to be a very thick layer for the hoard to be buried.
    2.There is a hoard buried by a layer of sand. (the process of burial was done by wind, animal, tractor...)
    I also find this rather unnatural sounding.
    "There is a hoard" just doesn't sound right to me, and neither does the passive.
    I might rephrase it to something like:
    A layer of sand covered the small hoard.

    In both sentences, I think you would need to specify beforehand what the hoard consisted of.
    Without any previous reference, "the hoard" doesn't sound right.

    Cross-posted with FQ & LC
     

    FoolishQuestions

    Banned
    Nepalese: Nepal
    Thank you, London calling. I did think that 'under' is the word but I often feel intimidated by native English speakers:) as I respect them and their knowledge very highly.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top