burning beneath the heat of the office strip lighting

Alex Coseff

Senior Member
Czech
Hello,

by any chance, by saying the phrase in bold, does the author want to say that she felt like being "cross-examined" and "grilled"?
Thank you.
Background info: The police officer has been summoned to Superintendent´ s office after her naked photos (from her teenage years, long before she became a police officer) appeared on the front page in the local newspaper.

Victoria Jenkins: The girls in the water
Of course she didn´t . She didn´t want to explain it any more than she wanted to be sitting in the Superintendent´s office right there and then, burning beneath the heat of the office strip lighting. She could explain it, but what would that achieve? The outcome was going to be the same.
 
  • lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    burning beneath the heat of the office strip lighting

    I don’t think that’s a specific reference to a stereotypical cross-examination. Maybe it just means what it says, that it was very hot in his office? He was hot too: “She could see a sheen of sweat on his forehead.”

    Or maybe it’s just an excuse to use the word “strip” in a different context?
     

    Alex Coseff

    Senior Member
    Czech
    Thank you, Lingobingo. There is no mention about the temperature, though. He was sweating because he was nervous, feeling uneasy about the topic they were supposed to discuss and so was she.
    I don´t know really.
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Well, I’d be inclined to take it fairly literally. Although there had been another reference to strip lighting and sweating (chapter 35).
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    It seems a bit sarcastic to me - fluorescent strip lighting doesn't actually generate enough heat that a person can actually feel it. It's not exactly the spotlight that you see police use to question people with in old movies.
     
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