Burst into laughter/ Burst out laughing/ Started to laugh

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lizwu

Member
Chinese
Hi everyone, I looked up the dictionary, and found these three terms relating to laugh.

My question is, does "burst into/out" carry a more hilarious meaning than "started to laugh"?

I mean, if someone "burst into laughter", does he laughs louder and more suddenly, comparing to "he started to laugh?"

Because I want to depict someone laughing, but I think "burst" would exaggerate what I want to describe.

Also, is their other phrase to describe someone laughing?
 
  • owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    I mean, if someone "burst into laughter", does he laughs louder and more suddenly, comparing to "he started to laugh?"
    Yes. "Burst" highlights the loudness and suddenness of the laughter.

    There are many words that describe laughter, lizwu. "Chuckle", "cackle", "guffaw" and "giggle" all describe different types of laughter. Adventurous writers might even use some word like "hiss" (the sound a snake makes) in a passage about laughter.
     

    perpend

    Banned
    American English
    It's an interesting question. In my opinion, "burst into/out in laughter" is almost involuntary. Sort of like an LOL.

    You couldn't contain yourself, and just had to laugh.

    "started to laugh" doesn't quite seem the same for me.

    There is also "to break out in laughter", if that helps.

    Last not least: :D
     
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