bursting their bonds

redgiant

Senior Member
Cantonese, Hong Kong
The man said suddenly. "The monsters in the coal mines are at the point of bursting their bonds! They will break free tonight, they will swarm down from the mountains and take what they want from this village food, money, women, revenge - you are all in danger. "

Source: Timepiece, Heather Albano
Background: A man from the future, with the help of a magical pocket watch, arrived at a village where a monster rebellion was going to take place at night. He was put in a holding cell over a physical altercation with a woman he tried to persuade to leave the village. He kept yelling at the guard that the monsters in the coal mines nearby were up to something sinister, pleading that they evacuate the village. Sadly, his pleading fell on deaf ears and was met with derision.

Should I take "burst their bonds" literally or figuratively? The book doesn't mention the working conditions in the mines, so I'm not sure whether the bonds literally means some kind of ropes or chains that held the monsters. One thing that I know is that the British had been taming them for decades.
 
  • ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    Yes, so would I ~ I reckon if the author had meant something non-literal, she would've used some other wording which, to modern eyes, didn't sound so ... well, literal:D
     

    redgiant

    Senior Member
    Cantonese, Hong Kong
    Thanks Kevin and ewie. Yes, it's a safe bet to interpret it as literal. And monsters bursting the bonds aren't that uncommon in tales.
     
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