bush/shrub

Dear friends!!!

In the summer residences of Russian emperors in Petergoph and Tsar's Village they are big landscape parks laid out in accordance with the French formal style: long straight avenues, carefully trimmed trees, ponds, arbours, pavillions and other characteristic elements. Which word should I use to describe small plants growing along the avenues (and not only there): bushes or shrubs? In English books about parks I often see the word "shrub", but I do not see much difference I must say.

Thanks!!!
 
  • cyberpedant

    Senior Member
    English USA, Northeast, NYC
    Either will do nicely. The word "shrub" implies to me a plant that is somehow better taken care of, but that may be a purely personal opinion. I don't believe there is any technical, biological difference.
     
    Either will do nicely. The word "shrub" implies to me a plant that is somehow better taken care of, but that may be a purely personal opinion. I don't believe there is any technical, biological difference.
    Thanks!!! Although you say that they sound practically identical to you, I think you have guessed the distinction I was trying to find. In fact, I suspected that "shrub" is a plant looked after more carefully than a bush and therefore shrubs rather than bushes are talked about in contexts I have described in post #1. The residences of Russian emperors had to be kept in perfect condition so as to to make an impression on foreign guests arriving there for diplomatic purposes. That is why garden workers had to regularly trim all the plants that grew in the parks.

    Thanks again!!!
     

    ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    I agree that the dividing-line between a shrub and a bush is a wee bit hazy, but I'd definitely prefer shrub (or, to make it sound a bit prettier, flowering shrub, if it's that type) for your circumstances, Dmitry. A shrub is generally cultivated for its decorative qualities (think azaleas) while a bush is generally growing wild (think brambles). Before anyone jumps down my throat, please note those two generallys.
     
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