business or pleasure

CORALINNA

Senior Member
Portuguese - Brasil
When you are at the airport and you go through customs they ask you the reason of your trip: "Business or pleasure?", so obviously you can answer: "For pleasure".


But if you are at a hotel and start talking to someone and they ask you: "Are you here on business?", is it alright to say: "I'm here for pleasure."? I find it weird to say so, but I would like to have a second opinion on that.
 
  • Miss Julie

    Senior Member
    English-U.S.
    When you are at the airport and you go through customs they ask you the reason of your trip: "Business or pleasure?", so obviously you can answer: "For pleasure".

    But if you are at a hotel and start talking to someone and they ask you: "Are you here on business?", is it alright all right to say: "I'm here for pleasure."? I find it weird to say so, but I would like to have a second opinion on that.

    I would say "I'm here on vacation." (If I were British, I would say "I'm here on holiday.")
     

    CORALINNA

    Senior Member
    Portuguese - Brasil
    If you are looking for a common-speak, idiomatic way to say this, I'd suggest, "No, I'm just on vacation." or "No, just for fun."

    No one really says pleasure to be honest.

    So, you wouldn't even answer that at the customs?
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    It sounds odd to me as well. Moreover, that could be taken in more than one way.

    If you're talking about the famous Brazilian "motels," they wouldn't bother to ask, of course. :rolleyes:
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    So, you wouldn't even answer that at the customs?

    I think you're more likely to be asked at immigration, rather than customs, but I would use the same terminology as the official.

    My last trip to an English-speaking country was to Canada, where they asked "what is the purpose of your trip to Canada?"

    "Tourism" always works, but my "fishing" was readily accepted as well. :D
     
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