Busy vs. working intensive

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jokaec

Senior Member
Chinese - Hong Kong
His job is very "busy" or "working intensive". He gets no time to rest and uses the restroom.

Are they both correct? If so, is there any difference? Thank you.
 
  • GreenWhiteBlue

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    Both are incorrect. A job is not busy, although it may cause a person to be busy. "Working intensive", though, is simply not English. Also note that (in American English at least) "restroom" is a term for the room where one finds toilets and sinks, and such rooms are not used for resting in the ordinary sense of the word.
     

    jokaec

    Senior Member
    Chinese - Hong Kong
    Both are incorrect. A job is not busy, although it may cause a person to be busy. "Working intensive", though, is simply not English. Also note that (in American English at least) "restroom" is a term for the room where one finds toilets and sinks, and such rooms are not used for resting in the ordinary sense of the word.
    Thank you GreenWhiteBlue.
    In this case, which word can be used to describe a job, if it causes a person to be very busy?
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    Your second sentence is the same as "He uses the restroom and gets no time to rest." The negative doesn't apply to "uses the restroom" so it seems he poops and pees a lot.

    He is very busy at work / at his job. He gets no time to rest or use the restroom.
    Now he can't poop or pee at all which is a problem.
     

    jokaec

    Senior Member
    Chinese - Hong Kong
    Your second sentence is the same as "He uses the restroom and gets no time to rest." The negative doesn't apply to "uses the restroom" so it seems he poops and pees a lot.

    He is very busy at work / at his job. He gets no time to rest or use the restroom.
    Now he can't poop or pee at all which is a problem.
    Thank you Myrmidon.
    I know "busy" can be used as "he is very busy at work", but can a job be described as "busy"? If not, which word can be used to describe a job if whoever do this job will be very busy?
     

    Florentia52

    Modwoman in the attic
    English - United States
    You are correct that we would not say 'He doesn't like busy jobs."

    "He doesn't like jobs at where he has to work busily" would be acceptable without the "at," though I'm not sure "working busily" exactly conveys your original meaning.
     
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