But all dining rooms were deserted and none of them were set up <for a meal yet to come>.

park sang joon

Senior Member
Korean
In that it seemed about lunchtime I checked out the several dining rooms in which the family generally ate. But all of them were deserted and none of them were set up for a meal yet to come. Nor did any of them show signs of a meal having recently been dispatched.
["Sign of Chaos" of The Great Book of Amber by Roger Zelazny]
I'd like to know if the underlined phrase means ", so a meal has yet to come."
Thank you in advance for your help.
 
  • dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    "a meal yet to come" here means "a meal later".

    You know the phrase "set up for a meal"? Servants do that, well before the actual meal: set the table with plates, glasses, napkins, forks, candles (not lit yet), everything but the food.

    As he says "meal yet to come" he seems to expect that in this house, the setting would happen long before the meal. Perhaps right after breakfast is finished, they "set up" the dining room table for lunch, and so on. That would be common, in a house where the dining table (and the whole room) is only used at mealtimes.

    He is looking for signs that people are living there. Not finding any dining rooms "set up" is evidence that no one is.
     

    park sang joon

    Senior Member
    Korean
    Thank you, djibear, for your very helpful answer. :)
    Then I'd like to know if I can take it that "for a meal yet to come" means "for a meal that has yet to come."
     
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