But for now, the 'takeaway' is clear.

MINDY_OY

Senior Member
Chinese
Hi, everyone,

Could anyone tell me what does "takeaway" mean in this sentence "But for now, the takeaway is clear. 'More aerobic exercise' for young people, Mr. Kuhn said. " It is in the last passage of the article "Can Exercise Make Kids Smarter“ from New York Times. The ending of the previous passage is "There’s no evidence that exercise leads to a higher I.Q., but the researchers suspect that aerobic exercise, not strength training, produces specific growth factors and proteins that stimulate the brain, said Georg Kuhn, a professor at the University of Gothenburg and the senior author of the study."

I thought that "takeaway" could just be understood as "one thing" , but it perhaps had some other metapherical meaning that was unknown to me. So, I hope someone could give me some tips. Thanks in advance.
 
  • Tazzler

    Senior Member
    American English
    I guess it means something like "the main idea to be considered or followed". I personally find this usage rather strange.
     

    MINDY_OY

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    Thanks Uriel-. Yet I still not that understand the meaning of the phrase "take(-)away"? Does it euqal to "the message you should learn from this" or "one definitive message"?
    It's a newer usage, but it's just shorthand for "the message you should take away from this" or "the take-away message".
     
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