But I won't lose no sleep on that

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Yang

Senior Member
Taiwan /Traditional Chinese
Rule #14
Rule #14
Of that I'm sure.
Rule #14
She was with another man.
But I won't lose no sleep on that,
'Cause I've got a plan.
--James Blunt - You're Beautiful

1.) 'lose sleep over something' means 'to worry about something'.
Then, 'I won't lose no sleep on that.' means 'I definitely won't worry about that.' or 'I definitely will worry about that.'?
I've got confused. No sleep = none of any sleep = not any sleep ? :confused:


2.) Does 'Of that I'm sure.' mean 'I'm sure of that = I'm sure that I saw an angel' ?

Any opinions would be appreciated.:)

<Mod edit - to restrict to four sentences>
 
  • kuleshov

    Senior Member
    Spain Spanish
    It means that you'll sleep well that night, so you won't worry about it at all. This expression has been used a lot recently in Europe about avian flu. Experts on TV keep telling us that we don't have to lose sleep over avian flu, meaning if you sleep 8 hours a day you have to continue sleeping 8 hours a day. When you lose sleep over something you sleep only 3 or 4 hours and the remaining hours you just can't go to sleep because you are thinking "Oh my God we are all gonna die!
     

    Yang

    Senior Member
    Taiwan /Traditional Chinese
    Oh, thank you, kuleshov, for such an interesting and funny explanation.:)
     

    ElaineG

    Senior Member
    USA/English
    1.) 'lose sleep over something' means 'to worry about something'.
    Then, 'I won't lose no sleep on that.' means 'I definitely won't worry about that.' or 'I definitely will worry about that.'? Kuleshov said it all
    I've gotten confused. No sleep = none of any sleep = not any sleep ? :confused: In the song he's using a grammatically incorrect double negative (which songwriters are of course allowed to do). Normally, you'd say, "I won't lose any sleep over it."


    2.) Does 'Of that I'm sure.' mean 'I'm sure of that = I'm sure that I saw an angel' ?:tick:

     

    Yang

    Senior Member
    Taiwan /Traditional Chinese
    ElaineG, thank you for your detailed and clear explanations.:)
    Oh, and the correction, thank you.:)
    Now you have helped me out of this question.
     

    Yang

    Senior Member
    Taiwan /Traditional Chinese
    E-J said:
    ... "got" is acceptable here in British English. :)
    Thank you, E-J.:)
    Actually, it's quite often that I'm not sure whether what I have written is right or not.:p
     

    nycphotography

    Senior Member
    American English
    Yang said:
    1.) 'lose sleep over something' means 'to worry about something'.
    To worry excessively to the point of not being able to sleep.

    Yang said:
    Then, 'I won't lose no sleep on that.' means 'I definitely won't worry about that.' or 'I definitely will worry about that.'?
    I've got confused. No sleep = none of any sleep = not any sleep ? :confused:
    There is a grammatically incorrect double negative in there that confuses non-native speakers. What we HEAR is "I won't lose ANY sleep about that" because we know from context that he's not worried about it.

    I don't hear no noise! = I don't hear ANY noise.


    Now imagine our frustration trying to read Spanish or Portuguese with all the grammatically CORRECT double negatives. Or the grammatically correct uses of a single negatives to sarcastically or emphatically mean the positive.
     

    Yang

    Senior Member
    Taiwan /Traditional Chinese
    nycphotography said:
    To worry excessively to the point of not being able to sleep.

    What we HEAR is "I won't lose ANY sleep about that" because we know from context that he's not worried about it.
    I don't hear no noise! = I don't hear ANY noise.:thumbsup:
    nycphotography, thank you for providing some more good explanations.
    The empathetic remarks is great.:)
     
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