But if you're gonna have an affair

Pavel Pin

Senior Member
Telugu
Halley describing about her ex husband to Cliff:

Halley: He was, you know, very brilliant. <---> Real handsome and everything. But if you're gonna have an affair, not with my best friend.

Cliff: Really?

Halley: In my four-poster bed. <--->
What is the meaning of "but if"?

Is she saying her husband suggested her not to have an affair with his best friend in In his four-poster bed ?

Source: Crimes and Misdemeanors 1989


Edited to reduce quotation to comply with Rule 4. Cagey, moderator
 
Last edited by a moderator:
  • entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    Well, obviously she didn't want her husband to have an affair at all. But if he wanted an affair, she might accept it if the woman was a stranger and they did it somewhere else. Doing it in her (their) bed makes it worse. And doing it with her best friend makes it worse too. So it's like:

    So if you must have an affair, please do it somewhere else, not in my bed, and please don't betray with my best friend.
     

    Pavel Pin

    Senior Member
    Telugu
    Hello entangledbank, Sorry, I made some changes to the thread and also ex husband is not Cliff. Cliff is just a friend to Halley.
     

    entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    That doesn't matter. She's not talking to her husband, she's talking about him. Or in her imagination, she's talking to her husband in the past: If you must have an affair, please don't soil my bed and my best friend. Don't have an affair, but if you do, don't make it even worse . . .

    The word 'you' is partly her ex-husband, thought about in the past, and partly the general meaning 'one', making it a rule: If someone has an affair, they shouldn't do it in the marital bed, nor should they make the partner's best friend the other one in the affair.
     
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