But instead of though at the end of a sentence.

leebro

New Member
english - australian
I have a young American character in a play I'm writing. I have her saying, "You sound like you could be, but." She's not sophisticated enough to use though instead of but. I'm in Australia and I don't know whether a poorly educated American child would use but in this way. If not, what word would she use instead?
 
  • Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    That use of 'but' is completely unfamiliar to me. It doesn't sound unsophisticated to an American, but wrong.

    I would expect 'though' in that position.

    Added: This is what our dictionary has to say about that adverbial use of but:
    2. Scot Austral NZ informal though; however: it's a rainy day: warm, but

    That explains it. :)
     
    Last edited:

    Hildy1

    Senior Member
    English - US and Canada
    The "but" may be the first word in a clause that is not finished.
    - You sound like you could be, but... (I'm not quite convinced, etc.)

    Could you provide more context, particularly the sentence before and the one after the one you quoted?
     

    leebro

    New Member
    english - australian
    Hi Cagey

    Thanks. I know it's wrong. But do you know whether there's a slang word used by some Americans in place of though at the end of a sentence?

    Lee
     

    leebro

    New Member
    english - australian
    Hi Hildy1

    Him: I'm British, but, no, I'm not related to the Queen.

    Her: You sound like you could be, but. Does everyone tell you that?

    Do you know whether there's a slang word used by some Americans in place of though at the end of a sentence?
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    No, I don't, unfortunately.

    I am not certain how hold this child is, and what her linguistic ability is supposed to be, but 'though' is the most natural tag to the end of that sentence as it is written. It is not a slangy sentence, to my ear.
     
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