but it was probably a good thing that

< Previous | Next >

Jardino

Senior Member
Korean
Topic
Brighton Rock by Graham Greene
Animal Farm by George Orwell ...
It was a formidable list and by now Mrs Phelps was filled with wonder and excitement, but it was probably a good thing that she did not allow herself to be completely carried away by it all.
Source : Matilda by Royald Dahl

Could you tell me what that grean 'it' indicate here?
Books? or recommending books to Matilda ?
 
  • coiffe

    Senior Member
    USA
    American English
    "It" actually refers to the complement "that she did not allow herself to be completely carried away by it all."

    This could be rephrased as:

    "That she did not allow herself to be completely carried away by it all was probably a good thing." When the "was probably a good thing" is fronted, "it" is inserted at the beginning because the sentence must begin with a noun phrase.
     

    Jardino

    Senior Member
    Korean
    "It" actually refers to the complement "that she did not allow herself to be completely carried away by it all."

    This could be rephrased as:

    "That she did not allow herself to be completely carried away by it all was probably a good thing." When the "was probably a good thing" is fronted, "it" is inserted at the beginning because the sentence must begin with a noun phrase.
    Now, I understood the grammar by your explanation. But, I'm not still sure about the meaning of this sentence.
    Here's what I understood
    Original text : Mrs Phelps was filled with wonder and excitement but it was probably a good thing that she did not allow herself to be completely carried away by it all.
    My guessing : Mrs Phelps was filled with wonder and excitement but that she did not allow herself to become completely so excited and lose control by how matilda is brilliant and amazaing.
    My guessing seems correct ?
     

    coiffe

    Senior Member
    USA
    American English
    Jardino, I'm not sure if you're right -- not enough context. But the sentence you've given us to work with says that it was good that Mrs. Phelps wasn't "carried away by it all." Okay that she was excited, okay that she was filled with wonder, but also good that she wasn't absolutely "carried away by it all," meaning she didn't go totally crazy about all of it.

    (Note: is "all of it" the idea that Matilda is brilliant and amazing? Then your guess is correct, if that's what "all of it" refers to.)
     

    Jardino

    Senior Member
    Korean
    Jardino, I'm not sure if you're right -- not enough context. But the sentence you've given us to work with says that it was good that Mrs. Phelps wasn't "carried away by it all." Okay that she was excited, okay that she was filled with wonder, but also good that she wasn't absolutely "carried away by it all," meaning she didn't go totally crazy about all of it.

    (Note: is "all of it" the idea that Matilda is brilliant and amazing? Then your guess is correct, if that's what "all of it" refers to.)
    Thank coiffe. I was just confused with two 'it' in that sentence. Maybe my guessing is correct. Here's context after that sentence : Almost anyone else witnessing the achievements of this small child would have been tempted to make a great fuss and shout the news all over the village and beyond, but not so Mrs Phelps.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top