...but now it's for the complete opposite reason

deltron

Senior Member
English (American)
I would appreciate any help with this phrase. Here's the context: I'm trying to compare how two people evaluate a data set. Let's say in File 1, Engineer A and Engineer B both said all the data was incorrect, and both removed 100% of the data from the file. They have a 100% agreement percentage. For File 2, both A and B said that all of the data was 100% correct, and they removed no data--they once again have a 100% agreement percentage, but now it's for the complete opposite reason. Which is to say with one file they are removing all the data, and with one file they are keeping all the data. In general, it is rare to see a 100% agreement percentage between engineers.

As for the German, here's my try (I translate agreement percentage as Übereinstimmungsprozentzahl, but maybe there's a better term for it):

Die Übereinstimmungsprozentzahl zwischen den Ingenieuren liegt nochmals bei 100%, aber diesmal aus dem komplett gegenteiligen Grund. It's really just a guess, and I'm not sure about the construction at all.

Thanks in advance for any feedback! :)
 
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  • deltron

    Senior Member
    English (American)
    My first thought was “aus dem umgekehrten Grund.” Let's see what natives say.
    Thanks for the reply! And, oops, I threw a ü in Grund...will edit the OP. If that construction works, it seems like it would be OK to add the "komplett" i.e. "aus dem komplett umgekehrten Grund."
     

    Hutschi

    Senior Member
    Hi, that works.
    I would say, however, because of »complete«:
    Heute ist es aus dem genau entgegengesetzten Grund.
    This is more intensive than „aus dem umgekehrten Grund“ ("umgekehrt" is more neutral).

    PS:

    Thanks for the reply! And, oops, I threw a ü in Grund...will edit the OP. If that construction works, it seems like it would be OK to add the "komplett" i.e. "aus dem komplett umgekehrten Grund."
    This works, too. I'm not sure here whether "aus dem genau umgekehrten Grund" is better, maybe “komplett“ works, too - as you proposed.
     
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