but safe job in a fit of rage,...

Beautifully

Senior Member
Korea, Korean
Hello!
The following from certain nespaper make me confused.

When she quits her boring but safe job in a fit of rage, her uncle Will introduces her to event planner Kelly and her new life begins from there.

What I wonder is that "a fit of rage" I checked the dictionary, and found several meaning of rage, as I guess, the most relevant meaning of rage would be popular or fashinable.

Would you tell me how to approach into the word of rage?
I thank you very much!
 
  • panjandrum

    Occasional Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    Gently disagreeing with Elwintee - using mad as Nun-T did is OK with me. In some contexts mad means insane, but often it means furious, and sometimes it's a bit of both.
     

    Nunty

    Modified
    Hebrew-US English (bilingual)
    Gently disagreeing with Elwintee - using mad as Nun-T did is OK with me. In some contexts mad means insane, but often it means furious, and sometimes it's a bit of both.
    Quitting a secure job in a fit of anger strikes me as "a bit of both", but thank you, Elwintree, for the reminder of the AE/BE divide.
     

    boozer

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian
    It means a passing phase, a period of something happening with particular force... I am sure the definition can be found :)
     
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