but that ... hasten

sakya kim

Senior Member
myanmar
in this following contexs, should it be: the clause ''he taught'' between the words ''but' and 'that' ?
And can the verb ''hasten'' have imperative meaning in this context?

Thanks to All.

The contexts:
And the rising and falling is produced by the transmission of force originally generated by wind. Just so the Buddha did not teach that it is an ego-entity, or a soul, that hastens through the ocean of rebirth, but that it is in reality merely a life-wave which, according to its nature and activities, appears here as man, there as animal, and elsewhere as invisible being.

Source:
Collected Wheel Publications Volume XXVI
 
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  • anthox

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    in this following contexs, should it be: the clause ''he taught'' between the words ''but' and 'that' ?
    No, it doesn't need to be inserted there because the structure of the sentence implies it. "He didn't teach this, but that." = "He didn't teach this, but [he taught] that." This is normal and it would be redundant to repeat "he taught."

    And can the verb ''hasten'' have imperative meaning in this context?
    No. I wonder why you would think so? The sentence structure doesn't support an imperative meaning, and the verb is conjugated in the third person to agree with "ego-entity"/"soul." The imperative form would be hasten.
     
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