but the place had enough interest attaching to it

SuprunP

Senior Member
Ukrainian & Russian
Bathsheba had probably left Weatherbury long before this time, but the place had enough interest attaching to it to lead Oak to choose Shottsford fair as his next field of inquiry, because it lay in the Weatherbury quarter.
(T. Hardy; Far from the Madding Crowd)

Can I say: "...but the place had enough interest attached to it to lead Oak to..."?

Thanks.
 
  • ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    :thumbsup: I'd certainly say attached rather than attaching, Suprun. English has changed a lot since 1874, or rather it's changed severally, in a lot of small ways, like this.

    The other option would be to leave it out altogether: the place had enough interest to lead Oak to choose ...
     

    wandle

    Senior Member
    English - British
    To me it seems 'attaching to it' is perfectly good and better than 'attached to it': the effect is gentler, subtler and psychologically more realistic.

    A few examples of the phrase in use:

    http://www.musee-rodin.fr/en/professionals/respecting-moral-right
    the principal task of the museum is to “make known Rodin's work and ensure the moral right attaching to it is respected”

    http://www.fp-marine.com/risk-management/war-risks-cargo
    Whilst this country has an element of heightened risk attaching to it, Underwriters have not generally sought to charge additional premiums in the recent past

    http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/cr/summary/v034/34.4laird.html
    The purpose of the present notice is to report the fragment's existence, calling attention to a few special points of interest attaching to it.
     
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    ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    the effect is gentler, subtler and psychologically more realistic.
    I rarely strive for the same effects as Thomas Hardy.

    P.S. I have absolutely no idea what you might mean by 'psychologically more realistic'. An explanation would be nice, but might well be too subtle for me.
     

    wandle

    Senior Member
    English - British
    'Attached' implies that one thing is definitely fixed to another. The condition depicted is complete and final.
    'Attaching' suggests the process is ongoing, gradual or partial. The condition is more open to movement or change.

    The latter seems to me a more realistic way to depict human feeling and sentiment.
     

    ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    It was as I feared.

    I can't shake off the feeling that in 2012 (including in all three samples in #4) attaching rather than attached is ... what's the word I'm looking for? ... ah yes: pretentious. By 'pretentious' I mean this: it seems to me in those three examples that the writer thought to himself, "What's a fancier way of saying attached? ~ ah, I know, I'll say attaching instead: no-one says it that way any more so it'll make me stand out as a chap of intellect and refinement blah blah blah".
     
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