but the relative degree of overweight was found to increase

ClauC

Member
Spanish
but the relative degree of overweight was found to increase with the frequency of meat consumption

sino que el grado relativo de sobrepeso aumenta con el frecuente consumo de carne

¿está bien como traduje?
 
  • fenixpollo

    moderator
    American English
    La frase "degree of overweight" no es correcto, porque overweight es un adjetivo, no un sustantivo. Tal como está, no se puede traducir como el sustantivo "el sobrepeso".

    Por favor, muéstranos la oración completa, describe la situación, nombra el texto original, y ayúdanos a entender a qué se refiere. ¿Será un error hecho por un angloparlante no nativo? ¿O se referirá a otra cosa que "el sobrepeso"?
     

    bandini

    Senior Member
    inglés gabacho aunque vivo en Mexico
    La frase "degree of overweight" no es correcto, porque overweight es un adjetivo, no un sustantivo. Tal como está, no se puede traducir como el sustantivo "el sobrepeso".

    Por favor, muéstranos la oración completa, describe la situación, nombra el texto original, y ayúdanos a entender a qué se refiere. ¿Será un error hecho por un angloparlante no nativo? ¿O se referirá a otra cosa que "el sobrepeso"?
    Ay señor fenixpollo es usted tal exigente como detallista! jajaja
     

    Oldy Nuts

    Senior Member
    Spanish - Chile
    Well, I had always considered Werriam-Webster to be a reliable source, but your comments make me doubt. This is what it says of overweight as a noun. Should I stop using this dictionary?


    Captura de pantalla 2017-09-04 a la(s) 09.06.26.png
     

    FromPA

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Well, I had always considered Werriam-Webster to be a reliable source, but your comments make me doubt. This is what it says of overweight as a noun. Should I stop using this dictionary?


    View attachment 23351
    It is a good dictionary for AE. I went to MW and saw that it said overweight can be used as a noun, but it didn't provide any examples. The Oxford dictionary did provide examples consistent with what has been posted above (a medical condition). I googled "overweight used as a noun" and found the discussion linked below that is consistent with the discussion here - i.e., it sounds very wrong to a lot of people, but it is in the dictionary, and there seems to be no other word to describe the condition of being overweight (not the same thing as obesity).

    Is "overweight" a noun?
     

    Oldy Nuts

    Senior Member
    Spanish - Chile
    Funny. I remember having been charged for the 2 kg overweight in my luggage by an American airline flying from New York, some thirty years now. And I understand that perhaps all the airlines still use overweight as a noun in this context, although this is not a medical condition... Can my memory have deteriorated so much?
     

    FromPA

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Funny. I remember having been charged for the 2 kg overweight in my luggage by an American airline flying from New York, some thirty years now. And I understand that perhaps all the airlines still use overweight as a noun in this context, although this is not a medical condition... Can my memory have deteriorated so much?
    I'd bet they didn't actually say it that way. That would make me think you were smuggling a fat person in your luggage. It's always used as an adjective - you get charged a fee for overweight baggage (an overweight fee).
     

    pachanga7

    Senior Member
    English - US
    In my experience, Merriam Webster is more a descriptivist dictionary than prescriptivist. That is, it tends to define terms more by popular usage than by what may be considered correct by the academics or by more traditional thinkers.
     

    Marco PCA

    Senior Member
    Spanish - Mexico
    The first time that I saw overweight was when I was studying for the IELTS exam: Overweight in many countries is a common problem and citizens' health and fitness... but I'm curious to know if you as a native speakers use a different word in everyday language apart from obesity :)
     

    pachanga7

    Senior Member
    English - US
    Curiously enough, I have never felt the need in my everyday life to refer to anybody's excess weight in precisely this way. This phrasing is more likely to be used by researchers and health professionals in their line of work, or by airlines struggling to sound formal in their attempts to fleece customers. :D

    On the other hand my friends and I might refer to being overweight, as a noun (gerund) phrase:

    Being overweight is bad for your health. Being overweight sucks.

    Some researchers also use excess weight, excess body weight, or even excess visceral adiposity:

    Obesity
    Excess body weight (EBW) is defined as the amount of weight that is in excess of the ideal body weight (IBW).
     
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