But <to confuse genealogists> , he had done it in a place where time flowed far more rapidly~

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park sang joon

Senior Member
Korean
The Amber's royal family member are half-immortal.
Oberon, the former king of Amber had married several women in Shadows, parallel worlds of Amber.

When Oberon's wife Riga had shown less hardihood than many by aging rapidly and retiring to a reclusive life at a country shrine, he had gone off and remarried, somewhat to the chagrin of their childrenㅡCaine, Julian and Gerad. But to confuse genealogists and sticklers for family legality, he had done it in a place where time flowed far more rapidly than in Amber.
["Trumps of Doom" of The Great Book of Amber by Roger Zelazny]
I'd like to know if the underlined to-infinitive phrase is similar to the prepositional phrase "to the chagrin of their children" in indicating the a result.
Thank you in advance for your help.
 
  • perpend

    Banned
    American English
    Are you comparing:
    A) to the chagrin of their children
    B) to confuse the genealogists and sticklers
     

    perpend

    Banned
    American English
    :)

    Yeah, no---two separate thoughts.
    A) the children weren't really keen on him remarrying
    B) in order to confuse the people who were tracking the family "genes", so-to-speak
     

    park sang joon

    Senior Member
    Korean
    Thank you, perpend, for your very helpful answer. :)
    I was wondering if the odds are that he did the things accidentally, not "intentionally."
     

    perpend

    Banned
    American English
    Since this is non-fiction, I assume it was "intentional". He went off and married elsewhere, to throw off any "gene-tracking" sleuths.
     

    park sang joon

    Senior Member
    Korean
    Thank you, perpend, for your continuing to answer. :)
    I'm afraid I'm badgering you.
    But, I'd much like to know if to-infinitive, at the beginning of a sentence, can indicate the result of the clause immediately following.
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    I'd much like to know if to-infinitive, at the beginning of a sentence, can indicate the result of the clause immediately following.
    Yes, it can:
    To make things worse, he forgot to leave a tip.
    To further cloud the issue, there were 4 dogs, not 3.

    But to confuse genealogists and sticklers for family legality, he had done it in a place where time flowed far more rapidly
    This one seems ambiguous to me. I can read it either way:

    In order to confuse future genealogists, he chose to do things this way.
    To the complete confusion of genealogists, it happened this way.

    The second form, with no "to", avoids this ambiguity. But that isn't what Zelazny used.
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    Genealogists do not study genes - they study family history.
    Genealogists and sticklers often make assumptions that there should be certain amounts of time between events. If you leave one wife, some people might expect there to be a certain amount of time (several months) before you marry your next wife. People will assume that you were cheating on your first wife or showing disrespect to her memory if she has died when you remarry quickly. After you marry the second wife, it should be nine months before the first child is born if the child was not conceived before the marriage.
    Someone looking at the records of this accelerated time schedule may assume that the father is a cheating, disrespectful husband and some of his children are bastards. This makes the children unhappy.
     
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