but unable (or unwilling) to resign

< Previous | Next >

NewAmerica

Banned
Mandarin
Does "but" here mean "and yet"? That is like when you are gagged, you want to speak "help", but (and yet) unable to make a voice?


Thanks in advance
*******************
No mechanism exists for removing a justice who is permanently incapacitated by illness or injury, but unable (or unwilling) to resign.

Because justices have indefinite tenure, timing of vacancies can be unpredictable.

-Wiki

Source
 
  • NewAmerica

    Banned
    Mandarin
    Outside force here refers to, for example, use your right hand to give your left hand a nip, you feel pain, right? It is your own force that causes your pain. Now someone nips your left hand, you feel pain and the force that causes your pain is outside force.
     

    NewAmerica

    Banned
    Mandarin
    Here is another use of "but": Does "but when" mean "only when"?

    Am I going to stop eating fish, or fishing? Probably not, but when I do I’ll feel bad about it.
    -Sci Am
    Source
     

    Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    Does "but when" mean "only when"?
    No, it doesn't. There is no "but when" here, by which I mean the two words do not belong together. The "but" is a stand-alone conjunction that joins (and contrasts) the two parts "probably not" and "when I do, I'll feel bad about it".
    The use of "but" is the same as in your original example.
     

    e2efour

    Senior Member
    UK English
    Outside force (#5) seems to mean either something supernatural or an external stimulus.

    I don't know what it is supposed to mean when applies to a justice of the Supreme Court.
     

    NewAmerica

    Banned
    Mandarin
    Outside force (#5) seems to mean either something supernatural or an external stimulus.
    Thanks. I got the nuance now.

    I don't know what it is supposed to mean when applies to a justice of the Supreme Court.
    Lets review the original sentence:No mechanism exists for removing a justice who is permanently incapacitated by illness or injury, but unable (or unwilling) to resign.

    Is the condition of being unable caused by the justice's own illness or injury? Or caused by outside force?
     

    NewAmerica

    Banned
    Mandarin
    No, it doesn't. There is no "but when" here, by which I mean the two words do not belong together. The "but" is a stand-alone conjunction that joins (and contrasts) the two parts "probably not" and "when I do, I'll feel bad about it".
    The use of "but" is the same as in your original example.
    Cool.:)
     

    se16teddy

    Senior Member
    English - England
    The judge is ill. Maybe he is too ill to resign - he is in a coma, or lacks the mental capacity to make a decision, or lacks the physical ability to sign his name. OR maybe he is stubborn and refuses to resign.
     
    Last edited:
    < Previous | Next >
    Top