butthurt

< Previous | Next >

TheCrociato91

Senior Member
Italian - Northern Italy
Hey everyone,
I would like to suggest the addition of the adjective "butthurt" (informal, slang English) to this dictionary, as I've heard it being used a lot in informal contexts. Let me know what you think about it, hopefully I haven't just made a complete fool of myself by overlooking its definition in this dictionary.
Best regards.
 
  • tsoapm

    Senior Member
    English (England)
    Surely ‘butthurt’ would be a noun? It seems superfluous to me: it’s clear enough if it remains as two separate nouns: butt hurt.
     

    tsoapm

    Senior Member
    English (England)
    I’ve only ever seen it as a noun. How would you even use it as an adjective? Do you have any examples? It might be a noun adjunct i.e. a noun functioning as an adjective, but so might any other noun.
     

    TheCrociato91

    Senior Member
    Italian - Northern Italy
    An example would be you telling a friend of yours whom you've just beaten at a game:
    "Why are you so butthurt? It's only a game".

    The Wikidictionary defines it as follows:
    Overly annoyed or bothered by a perceived insult; needlessly offended.
    "Don't get so butthurt; it was just a joke."

    I found out it can also be a noun, which I had never heard of. I've always heard/seen it being used as an adjective. You learn something new everyday
     

    jonny deep

    New Member
    english
    Hey everyone,
    I would like to suggest the addition of the adjective "butthurt" (informal, slang English) to this dictionary, as I've heard it being used a lot in informal contexts. Let me know what you think about it, hopefully I haven't just made a complete fool of myself by overlooking its definition in this dictionary.
    Best regards.
    I think it's an adjective because it's obviously just feeling human emotions
     

    tsoapm

    Senior Member
    English (England)
    Well I don’t know about the contexts ‘butthurt’ is used in, but if you consider just the word ‘hurt’ that it's formed from, that's a verb – and an irregular one too, where the plain form, past simple and past participle forms are all identical – a noun and an adjective. So there's plenty of potential uses.
     

    much_rice

    Senior Member
    English - American
    Well I don’t know about the contexts ‘butthurt’ is used in, but if you consider just the word ‘hurt’ that it's formed from, that's a verb – and an irregular one too, where the plain form, past simple and past participle forms are all identical – a noun and an adjective. So there's plenty of potential uses.
    Yup: it means "(having been) hurt in the butt," a past participle of a verb being used as an adjective. It's not a noun, though if it were I guess it would have to mean something like "pain in the ass."
     

    eno2

    Senior Member
    Dutch-Flemish
    I've seen butthurt profusely used in a Dutch political forum. The context was the tsunami of reactions when Trump won the elections.
    Past participle , used as a compound adjective and noun.

    For instance, after almost a year, one Trump admirer would post to a Trump hater: <Still butthurt? When is your butthurt going to subside>?
    (in Dutch, but with butthurt).
     
    Last edited:
    < Previous | Next >
    Top