Buyer's recommendation

meijin

Senior Member
Japanese
Hi, let's say you are shopping in a supermarket. You see a label on a pack of fresh meat that says "Buyer's recommendation" or "Recommended by the buyer". Would you easily understand that it is recommended by the person who purchased the meat from somewhere else for the store (do you call this person "a purchasing agent"?)?

How about if "buyer" was plural (i.e. "Buyers' recommendation" "Recommended by (the) buyers")? Would you think multiple purchasing agents are recommending it or shoppers who bought the meat (and ate it) are recommending it?
 
  • Glenfarclas

    Senior Member
    English (American)
    Hi, let's say you are shopping in a supermarket. You see a label on a pack of fresh meat that says "Buyer's recommendation" or "Recommended by the buyer".
    If I'm in the supermarket, I am the buyer. The supermarket is the seller. At best, I would take it to be the supermarket's boast that other customers had recommended this meat -- but I would assume that the label had been clumsily written by a non-native speaker of English.

    Would you easily understand that it is recommended by the person who purchased the meat from somewhere else for the store (do you call this person "a purchasing agent"?)?
    Who the hell would care what a store's purchasing agent had recommended? Your whole situation is bizarre.
     

    meijin

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    Who the hell would care what a store's purchasing agent had recommended?
    Some people in Japan, it seems. One of the supermarkets I often go to puts the label saying "Buyer's recommendation" or "Recommended by buyer" (written in Japanese, but the "buyer" part is in English) on meat, etc. We all know that it means the meat is recommended by a purchasing agent, because we never use "buyer" for us buyers. We only use "shoppers". I assumed that the label wouldn't work in English-speaking countries because "buyers" usually mean shoppers/consumers. I think the supermarket I go to puts the label in the same way restaurants put a sign "Chef's recommendation" on some of the menus.
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    I think the title is the issue. "Chef" is a fancy title. "Our cook's recommendation" would mean nothing, while "our Chef's recommendation" sounds impressive. In English we use French words (like "chef") to sound impressive. In Japanese you use English words. The label might not seem impressive if it used the Japanese word for "buyer".

    Some stores in the US do this, but they need to use an impressive title. A store may write "Manager's special cut" on some steaks.
     

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    Meijin - I see that in this thread Glenfarcisis basically agreeing that buyer is the store's purchasing agent. And you yourself are using buyer in that context too!

    I'm not saying a shopper cannot be called a buyer, but the usual use of the word in retail is in this role as a member of the shop's staff.
     

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    Actually I’m not so sure myself now!
    I maybe couldn’t see everything in this on my phone this morning.
    Hey ho!
     

    london calling

    Senior Member
    UK English
    People who work for a supermarket and deal with the purchasing of goods to be sold in the store are known as 'supermarket buyers' (see an example here from cips.org) in the UK. People who buy the stuff in the store are customers (or consumers): I wouldn't call them buyers, personally.

    That said, 'Buyer's choice' (or similar) doesn't really work : I agree that mentioning a 'Chef' has far more effect.

    PS. Years ago 'Pick of the day'/'Cut of the day' (for meat) were quite common but I haven't seen either in supermarkets for many years.
     

    meijin

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    People who work for a supermarket and deal with the purchasing of goods to be sold in the store are known as 'supermarket buyers' (see an example here from cips.org) in the UK. People who buy the stuff in the store are customers (or consumers): I wouldn't call them buyers, personally.
    That's really good to know.

    That said, 'Buyer's choice' (or similar) doesn't really work :
    Is it because shoppers don't trust supermarket buyers' assessment ability?
     

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    The reason buyer’s choice doesn’t work is becaue the role of «buyer » is not necessarily well-known or understood. It has no value as a marketing tool.

    What supermarkets DO do to express a “good choice” / premium product is develop an in house mark such as “Taste the Difference” (Sainsburys) or “Finest” (Tesco).

    They can then use this badge on any of their lines in the store.
     
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