By credit card

Rika_22

Member
Japanese
Hi everyone.

I have been wondering why you don't say "I'll pay by my credit card." I know that it's not "by my credit card," but it's always "by credit card." However, you pay by your credit card, right? Not someone else's. Then why is it incorrect to say "by my credit card?"
 
  • pops91710

    Senior Member
    English, AE/Spanish-Mexico
    My isn't necessary. It is assumed, however incorrectly that could be, that the credit card is yours. If you added my some overly suspicious clerk might want to then check your state-issued ID, which they quite often do and should.
     

    Enquiring Mind

    Senior Member
    English - the King's
    It's felt to be an adverbial description, like I'll go by my bike, I'll go by my car. It answers the question "how will you pay" (by my cash, by my card etc), not "whose credit card will you pay with?" or "what will you pay with?".
     

    Rika_22

    Member
    Japanese
    Hmm…so is it like a collocation?
    When you use “by,” it’s always “by credit card,” while when you use “with,” it’s “with my credit card.” Is that what you mean?
    Also, there’s no grammatical explanation? It’s just the way it is?
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    Hmm…so is it like a collocation?
    When you use “by,” it’s always “by credit card,” while when you use “with,” it’s “with my credit card.” Is that what you mean?
    Also, there’s no grammatical explanation? It’s just the way it is?
    I can pay with a credit card. I don't need to use "my".

    We speak the language and the "grammar people" try to determine what "rules" are being used. They don't always succeed :) and there is often a lot of discussion on terminology. Eventually, it often does come down to "Just the way we say things"
     

    Rika_22

    Member
    Japanese
    Okay, thank you :)
    One last question though, you said you don’t need to say “with my credit card,” and you can just say “with a credit card.” Is that because it’s obvious that you use your credit card? Also, are both sound correct and natural?
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English (US - northeast)
    We say this in response to a question.

    The question is asking what method you use to pay. There are several methods, and on modern cash registers, the clerk has to select the method on the machine. Some methods are: credit card, debit card, cash, personal check, traveller's check, food stamps, store credit, and money order.

    The question is not "Whose credit card is this?" So putting "my" is not answering the question.
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    Often it's just:

    "Debit or credit?" (Or "Will that be debit or credit?")

    "Credit."

    Usually all the rest is unnecessary.

    It might be a nice grammar question, but often doesn't have much much connection to real life and how things really work.
     

    Rika_22

    Member
    Japanese
    I see what you mean, dojibear and kentix. Thank you for answering!
    And thank you for the correction, pops91710!
     
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