by/from/through the door

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sunsail

Senior Member
de langue Turc
Hello

"she left the court by the back door" what does "by the back door" tell here?

Can I use "from/through back door"?

Thanks
 
  • mgcrules

    Senior Member
    English - Australia
    "by the back door" would mean that there are at least two entrances, one at the front and one at the back. Leaving through the back door is usually done to avoid press or anything unwanted.
    You can use "through", but I would use 'by'.
     

    sunsail

    Senior Member
    de langue Turc
    "by the back door" would mean that there are at least two entrances, one at the front and one at the back. Leaving through the back door is usually done to avoid press or anything unwanted.
    You can use "through", but I would use 'by'.

    Can I say " from the back door"? could it be implying anything else ? of course I know :) logically if there is one back door there must be front door.

    Because in my language it tells something else when you say go through the back door.You donot want anyone to see you or you secretly leave a place.

    why should someone leave the court through the back door? instead of front door?

    Best Regards
     

    shawnee

    Senior Member
    English - Australian
    As mgcrules has stated there is no double entendre in the use of 'by the back door here.' While there can be instances where there is an implied meaning where someone attains high office by unofficial means ie. 'by the back door' that is not the case here and need not be avoided for fear of misinterpretation.
     

    startrack

    New Member
    'by' is better, that's what I heard in University.
    It appears to me that if you use 'from', the person you are talking with must stand outside of the court. It is weird if you talk with a guy who sitting inside the court by using the world 'from'
    ps:not 100% sure.
     

    GreenWhiteBlue

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    The word "from" would sound very odd here, and I would not use it. If you really do not like "by", you could make it "by means of" instead, but "by" is better and perfectly natural (unlike the very strange "from".)
     

    shawnee

    Senior Member
    English - Australian
    When I said "You can" in post 6, I meant, 'since you are adamant on its use,' I wasn't really recommending it.
     
    From the point of view of those inside the courtroom, she can enter "from the back door"; but leaving "from the back door" is idiomatic only if the point of reference is outside the building. "She was able to avoid the press by leaving from the back door." This works (barely - by or through would be more common choices) because the press are outside the courtroom. To those inside, she left by or through, but never from, the back door.

    The reverse is also true. To those paparazzi outside the courtroom, she enters the room by or through the back door, but not from it. In other words, in this context, "from" suggests that the person is approaching the reference point of the speaker/narrator. "She emerged from the front door to greet the waiting throng."
     
    Last edited:

    sunsail

    Senior Member
    de langue Turc
    From the point of view of those inside the courtroom, she can enter "from the back door"; but leaving "from the back door" is idiomatic only if the point of reference is outside the building. "She was able to avoid the press by leaving from the back door." This works (barely - by or through would be more common choices) because the press are outside the courtroom. To those inside, she left by or through, but never from, the back door.

    The reverse is also true. To those paparazzi outside the courtroom, she enters the room by or through the back door, but not from it. In other words, in this context, "from" suggests that the person is approaching the reference point of the speaker/narrator. "She emerged from the front door to greet the waiting throng."

    Thanks edgy for your brief explanation :) I was looking for idiomatic example.
     
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