By no accident

< Previous | Next >

Silver

Senior Member
Chinese,Cantonese,Sichuan dialect
Hi,

I wonder "by no accident" is a phrase? I found "by accident" seem to be a phrase, what about this one?


"His success of being an interperter is by no accident."


Does the self-made context makes sense to you?


Thanks
 
  • panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    ...
    "His success of being an interperter is by no accident."

    Does the self-made context makes sense to you?
    No.
    You will find many examples of by accident.
    You will also find many examples of no accident.
    But very few of by no accident.

    I very strongly recommend that you use the forum's dictionary and thread title search to investigate common usage. It will save you (and us) a great deal of time.
     

    Silver

    Senior Member
    Chinese,Cantonese,Sichuan dialect
    Thanks a lot, Mr.P, I don't want to argue with you here, but I dare to say I do try to save your time and I do the search before I am here, if you don't believe, all my other lately threads could give you some confidence.
    And I think, one day there must be someone would come and ask "by no accident", you see what Tazzler said, he suppose my sentence maybe makes sense.
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    And I think, one day there must be someone would come and ask "by no accident", you see what Tazzler said, he suppose my sentence maybe makes sense.
    I'm afraid I disagree with Tazzler. For me, "His success of being as an interpreter is by no accident." is not idiomatic English:(. I would accept "His success as an interpreter is no accident."
     

    Valvs

    Senior Member
    Russian
    For me, "His success of being as an interpreter is by no accident." is not idiomatic English:(.
    I think it is not merely not idiomatic, but ungrammatical as well. When we say that something happened or was done by accident, the sentence requires a verb which tells us what was that that happened by accident. So if someone wants to use "by no accident", they must at least make sure that there is a verb in the sentence.
    I think that "It was by no accident that he succeeded as a translator" is at least grammatically correct (unlike the first Silver's sentence), which, of course, doesn't mean that is it idiomatic. :) (And yes, I know that "by" is not needed here and that the sentence will work better without it).
     

    owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    I agree with the others here, Silver. The phrase as you are using it sounds weird. Loob's suggestion sounded good to me: I would be happy with "...is no accident" - assuming the context explained why it was no accident.

    Building on this, I suggest: It's no accident that he is an interpreter. He speaks four languages fluently. (Loob is right. You want to explain a remark like this.)
     

    boozer

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian
    I think it is not merely not idiomatic, but ungrammatical as well. When we say that something happened or was done by accident, the sentence requires a verb which tells us what was that that happened by accident. So if someone wants to use "by no accident", they must at least make sure that there is a verb in the sentence.
    I think that "It was by no accident that he succeeded as a translator" is at least grammatically correct (unlike the first Silver's sentence), which, of course, doesn't mean that is it idiomatic. :) (And yes, I know that "by" is not needed here and that the sentence will work better without it).
    I agree. In short, in my mind, the phrase "by no accident" requires an action verb, not a link one, although I cannot say it's a rule:

    By no accident did he become an interpreter. - I can live with this one :)

    And I also agree with the others that are not very comfortable with the proposed sentence.

    PS. On the other hand, some say "become" can also be a link verb, which does not make it any easier :)
     

    Silver

    Senior Member
    Chinese,Cantonese,Sichuan dialect
    Thank you all, I will take down what you guys said. But I still think that in my sentence "is" works as "be verb".
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top