by stepping on the edge of the steps

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Gabriel Malheiros

Senior Member
Portuguese - Brazil
What does "going up by stepping on the edge of the steps" mean?

A: I will wait upstairs. When the meal is ready, I will come back.
B: It's ok. Just be careful that you don't slip and fall. The stairs are wet. Go up by stepping on the edges of the steps and holding on the handrail.
 
  • Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    I, too, wonder, because it's a very strange conversation. Can you describe the situation in which it takes place? Or provide a link to the site?
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    We'll look at things differently depending on the source, e.g. book, blog, conversation, English learning site, etc.

    My only thought on your question is that some steps have a safety strip (I don't know the actual term) on the edge of steps that is designed to keep your foot from slipping. As in this Google Image. And here are many of them. Sometimes they're just skid-proof strips; other times, they're a physical angle bar of some sort that wraps around the front of the step.
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    Grammatically, it seems fine to me, although some people won't understand the relevance or importance of stepping on the edge of the step.
     
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