'By which' problem

I have some problems with the usage of ' in which', 'by which' etc.
As I see it, I often regard 'by which' as '…, and by it…' For example, when I say 'Teachers and students should respect each other, and by it they can establish a harmonious relationship.", I would rephrase it to 'Teachers and students should respect each other, by which they can establish a harmonious relationship." Is this sentence correct and natural?(How about replacing 'by' with 'through'? Which is better? Why?)
Moreover, does my theory applies the same to 'on which', 'in which', etc? For example, when I think of a sentence like this: 'This is the room, and in it I was born.', I would say 'This is the room in which I was born.' Right?
 
  • grassy

    Senior Member
    Polish
    For example, when I say 'Teachers and students should respect each other, and by it they can establish a harmonious relationship.", I would rephrase it to 'Teachers and students should respect each other, by which they can establish a harmonious relationship." Is this sentence correct and natural?(How about replacing 'by' with 'through'? Which is better? Why?)
    I think the grammar is fine but I don't find it natural.
    "... thanks to which they can establish ..." or "... which can help them establish ..." would be better.

    For example, when I think of a sentence like this: 'This is the room, and in it I was born.', I would say 'This is the room in which I was born.' Right?
    That's correct.
     
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