by / within this week

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Tony Tseng

New Member
chinese
Hi guys,

May I know if there is any difference between "by this week" and "within this week"?

Examples:
1. Could you send a datasheet by this week?
2. Could you send a datasheet within this week?

With Thanks,
Tony
 
  • Beryl from Northallerton

    Senior Member
    British English
    Hello Tony Tseng, and Welcome to the Forum! :)

    I don't think that either of your examples could be used in BrE. I could tweak them for you.

    1. Could you send a datasheet by the end of this week? < --- I think that this now means send it to me before the weekend.

    2. Could you send a datasheet within this the week? < -- This, I think, is more ambiguous, but would probably be understood to mean 'within seven days of now'. :)
     

    Jordi elnino pola

    New Member
    English
    Hello Tony Tseng

    1. Could you send a datasheet by the end of this week? < --- I think that this now means send it to me before the

    2. Could you send a datasheet within this the week? < -- This, I think, is more ambiguous, but would probably be understood to mean 'within seven days of now'. :)
    I didn't get you, could you please tell me the difference between "by this week" and "within the week" and what does it mean "by the end of" ?

    Your answer should be highly appreciated.
     

    Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    the difference between "by this week" and "within the week" and what does it mean "by the end of" ?
    "By X" means before X, and this X is usually a point in time. When you instead mention a period of time, we tend to mean the point that is the beginning of that period. That is why "by this week" does not make sense, since this week has already started.
    "By the end of this week" means before this week is over. Typically in a working-week context, our point in time is end of Friday. If we get the datasheet before the weekend, it means we can take it home and study it over the weekend.

    I would have said "within a week" instead of "within the week" if I meant "no later than one week from now".
     

    Jordi elnino pola

    New Member
    English
    "By X" means before X, and this X is usually a point in time. When you instead mention a period of time, we tend to mean the point that is the beginning of that period. That is why "by this week" does not make sense, since this week has already started.
    "By the end of this week" means before this week is over. Typically in a working-week context, our point in time is end of Friday. If we get the datasheet before the weekend, it means we can take it home and study it over the weekend.

    I would have said "within a week" instead of "within the week" if I meant "no later than one week from now".
    That is confusing!
     
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