C'était une bonne nouvelle

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Mag1977

Senior Member
French - Switzerland
Hi!

Would you accept this translation: "it was a good news" or is it better to say "those were good news".

Thanks

Mag

PS
I haven't understood if "news" is used as a singular or a plural word yet... :confused:
 
  • texasweed

    Banned
    French-born/US English
    That was good news

    News is both singular and plural, somewhat like "information" (which never takes an "s" at the end.)
     

    Paulinne

    Member
    czech, the Czech republic
    Hi all!! :)
    In my opinion, news is uncountable.. So it isn't plural but on the other hand it isn't singular neither because we can't use "a".. The same case as information or advice, isn't it?
    P.
     

    emma42

    Senior Member
    British English
    Mag, if you wanted to refer to just one piece of news, you would have to say,

    That was an interesting piece of news
    That was an interesting news item (this would be used if talking about news on the TV)
    That was an interesting bit of news
     

    texasweed

    Banned
    French-born/US English
    la_cavalière said:
    Texasweed, can you think of a case where "news" is plural? I can't think of one.
    I posted one instance ! : What about when you watch the news ? One information and BANG, pubs et film ? ;)
    Even WR dictionary concurs.
     

    la_cavalière

    Senior Member
    anglais États-Unis
    texasweed said:
    I posted one instance ! : What about when you watch the news ? One information and BANG, pubs et film ? ;)
    Even WR dictionary concurs.
    The news on TV is singular:

    The news is on!

    Is the news over yet?

    The news starts at 10 p.m.
     

    risingsun

    Member
    Telugu, Hindi, English - India
    News is uncountable, just like information or advice, for that matter.

    Emma's examples are excellent as they quantify the news.
    If you do not want to quantify, we can say
    There was some good news.
    There was good news.

    Similarly,
    I have some advice for you.
    I have a piece of advice for you.
     

    marget

    Senior Member
    texasweed said:
    I posted one instance ! : What about when you watch the news ? One information and BANG, pubs et film ? ;)
    Even WR dictionary concurs.
    If someone were to ask me: "Did you watch the news"? I think I'd say "Yes, I saw watched it". I wouldn't say "Yes, I watched them".
    My own dictionary says that news always takes a singular verb. I think we'd use singular pronouns too.
     

    texasweed

    Banned
    French-born/US English
    news(plural & in general)nfpl nouvelles news(item) nf nouvelle news(recent events)nfactualités (presse, radio)
     

    emma42

    Senior Member
    British English
    Mag, you would translate that as "It's a terrible piece of news" - if that's what you were asking!

    The point is, you can't say "a news". It's that simple.
     

    texasweed

    Banned
    French-born/US English
    75 million and 200 thousand hits for "a news" on Google...
    I'm sick of this argument, just look it up on the dico. :(
     

    risingsun

    Member
    Telugu, Hindi, English - India
    I did check on the google. Checked up to 50 hits, none of them have "a news" as a stand alone expression. It is always followed by a noun like "a news item", "a news service" or "a news site", "a news conference" etc...
    "a" is clearly not for "news"...
     

    la_cavalière

    Senior Member
    anglais États-Unis
    texasweed said:
    75 million and 200 thousand hits for "a news" on Google...
    I'm sick of this argument, just look it up on the dico. :(
    We love you Texasweed, but unless you can find an example where "news" takes a plural verb ("the news were"), you have to trust us: news is never considered a plural noun.
     

    risingsun

    Member
    Telugu, Hindi, English - India
    la_cavalière said:
    We love you Texasweed, but unless you can find an example where "news" takes a plural verb ("the news were"), you have to trust us: news is never considered a plural noun.
    Gramatically speaking, in fact news is a plural noun which is used with a singular verb formation. But actually it is uncountable. It is neither singular nor plural.
     

    la_cavalière

    Senior Member
    anglais États-Unis
    risingsun said:
    Grammatically speaking, in fact news is a plural noun which is used with a singular verb formation. But actually it is uncountable. It is neither singular nor plural.
    You are technically correct, but the original poster wanted to know what kind of verb to use with "news." Telling someone that "news" can be either singular or plural confuses the issue.
     

    texasweed

    Banned
    French-born/US English
    la_cavalière said:
    We love you Texasweed, but unless you can find an example where "news" takes a plural verb ("the news were"), you have to trust us: news is never considered a plural noun.
    I'll take the challenge ;)

    In 1972, the news were reorganized once again
    The News were nominated for a Grammy award
    The news were everywhere
    The latest news were scandalous
    Viewers would benefit if the news were more parsimonious by using shorter terms
    The news were from the beginning exactly like BBC
    Etc, etc, etc....
    60 100 hits on Google.
     

    la_cavalière

    Senior Member
    anglais États-Unis
    texasweed said:
    I'll take the challenge ;)

    In 1972, the news were reorganized once again
    The News were nominated for a Grammy award
    The news were everywhere
    The latest news were scandalous
    Viewers would benefit if the news were more parsimonious by using shorter terms
    The news were from the beginning exactly like BBC
    Etc, etc, etc....
    60 100 hits on Google.

    Thank you, Texasweed.

    None of these examples sounds right to my native American ear.

    Plus, in your sentence beginning with "viewers," the verb "to be" is in the conditional form and not the plural form.
     

    risingsun

    Member
    Telugu, Hindi, English - India
    texasweed said:
    I'll take the challenge ;)

    1) In 1972, the news were reorganized once again
    2) The News were nominated for a Grammy award
    3) The news were everywhere
    4) The latest news were scandalous
    5) Viewers would benefit if the news were more parsimonious by using shorter terms
    6) The news were from the beginning exactly like BBC
    Etc, etc, etc....
    60 100 hits on Google.
    In your examples , 2, & 3, "the news" is the name of a band "Huey Lewis & the News"
    1 & 2, "the news" refers to the various news programmes
    5 as pointed by cavaliere, "were" is the conditional form
    As for 4, I tried to find in google, but couldn't....

    While the rest of your 60,100 hits, are something like this:
    1) the largest category of stories in the news were stories that share knowledge
    2)
    Over the past seventeen years 41 issues of the News were published
    3)
    Four journalists from the Liberian daily The News were released on March 30

    I really think you have taken this argument of yours too far by referring to the number of hits you get on Google. You should perhaps check the hits first... I have read your translations earlier and they are good. But you have to accept what we are saying here... Your argument fails you...
     

    texasweed

    Banned
    French-born/US English
    Fine, I surrender. Fact is : I'm beat. Dead tired. Slept some 4 hrs et je suis somnambule to top it. I'll discard all dictionaries' versions and let members have it their way :rolleyes:
     

    risingsun

    Member
    Telugu, Hindi, English - India
    texasweed said:
    Fine, I surrender. Fact is : I'm beat. Dead tired. Slept some 4 hrs et je suis somnambule to top it. I'll discard all dictionaries' versions and let members have it their way :rolleyes:

    What a surrender!!! You are not really surrendering, are you? Your reference to the so-called dictionary versions clearly means that we are wrong....

    Sorry that I am insisting even though you are tired... But which dictionary versions are you talking about??? Could you name them please..

    And maybe you should look at the following one:
    http://dictionary.reference.com/search?q=news
     

    la_cavalière

    Senior Member
    anglais États-Unis
    I haven't yet find a dicitonary that says that "news" is used with a plural verb.

    Here are a few:

    Merriam-Webster:
    news Function: noun plural but singular in construction

    Dictionary.com:
    news pl.n. (used with a sing. verb)

    American Heritage:
    news PLURAL NOUN (used with a sing. verb)

    Harper Collins:
    news NOUN SING
     

    risingsun

    Member
    Telugu, Hindi, English - India
    Just one last word for Texasweed... Please verify what you say on the Forum.. It is better to say "I do not know", "I am not sure", "I suggest" rather than mislead someone...
     

    OlivierG

    Senior Member
    France / Français
    Well, the original topic seems to have been fully addressed, so this thread is now closed.
    The outcome of this story could be: don't trust Google too much. ;)
     
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