Cómo te curras la foto!

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mejillon

Member
English - London
Hi

what does the above sentence mean? I understand from the only other 2 threads on currar, currarse it's like to work or work hard for something.

The foto in question is a bit of a ridiculous one. I don't think it means How hard you've worked for that foto, or anything of the sort

thanks as always :)
 
  • mejillon

    Member
    English - London
    the photo is a man stroking a fully-grown tiger! Doesn't give me any clues as to the meaning, personally :)
     

    ElCrackDeSantCugat

    Member
    English- US, Castellano- España
    Is this something about image editing and manipulation?

    "Mate, you don't have to put any work into your photos!" (informal BrE)

    syd
    mejillon,

    maidinbedlam is correct in the use of "currarse", but without further context you could take this several ways. What SydLexia posted above isn't totally wrong, it just carries a different meaning than the one I think this phrase implies, in my personal opinion. I would say:

    "You work very hard on your photos!"

    I hope this helps.
     

    SydLexia

    Senior Member
    UK English
    <snip>.. What SydLexia posted above isn't totally wrong, it just carries a different meaning than the one I think this phrase implies, in my personal opinion. I would say:

    "You work very hard on your photos!"

    I hope this helps.
    OK, I should have said informal ungrammatical British English, but the phrase I wrote was perfectly normal for the UK and means exactly what you mean.

    See a search for "you don't half".

    "You certainly put more than a little effort into your photos" would mean exactly the same, albeit in a different register.

    syd
     

    maidinbedlam

    Moderanged
    Spanish - Spain
    Is this something about image editing and manipulation?
    Yes, I thought of that, and in that line, a slightly different idea from the "ridiculous photo" theory:
    Te curras las fotos --- te salió una foto muy currada: muy chula, molona...
    (the result was a cool picture; not necessarily with a lot of work, but with skill)
     

    SuperScuffer

    Senior Member
    English - GB
    mejillon,

    maidinbedlam is correct in the use of "currarse", but without further context you could take this several ways. What SydLexia posted above isn't totally wrong, it just carries a different meaning than the one I think this phrase implies, in my personal opinion. I would say:

    "You work very hard on your photos!"

    I hope this helps.
    The changes you made to SydLexia's phrase, from:

    "Mate, you don't half put some work into your photos!" (informal BrE)

    to

    "Mate, you don't have to put any work into your photos!"

    totally reversed the meaning! SydLexia's phrase is a normal colloquial BrE phrase and carries the correct meaning for this topic.
     

    mejillon

    Member
    English - London
    I think Syd´s right. She must be a non-believer .... it looks like it could have been photoshopped in the sense that it is unusual to see a person stroking a tiger.

    Thanks very much for your help
     

    dilema

    Senior Member
    Spain-spanish
    OK, I should have said informal ungrammatical British English, but the phrase I wrote was perfectly normal for the UK and means exactly what you mean.

    See a search for "you don't half".

    "You certainly put more than a little effort into your photos" would mean exactly the same, albeit in a different register.

    syd
    Very interesting. I suppose that would be the equivalent to our:
    Anda que no has te has trabajado la foto [= Cuánto te has trabajado la foto]

    Evidently, the same could be said meaning just the oposite, in an ironic register. Couldn't it?
     

    ElCrackDeSantCugat

    Member
    English- US, Castellano- España
    OK, I should have said informal ungrammatical British English, but the phrase I wrote was perfectly normal for the UK and means exactly what you mean.

    See a search for "you don't half".

    "You certainly put more than a little effort into your photos" would mean exactly the same, albeit in a different register.

    syd
    SydLexia,

    I apologize for the unnecessary corrections. I have lots of family and even more friends from England, but this sounded quite off when I said it outloud to myself, even while thinking in a "British" mindset.

    Sorry for the mix-up.
     
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