cada día, todos los días

joshbars

Member
English United States
My question is whether or not "cada dia" y "todos los dias" can be used interchangeably. Are there times when one should be used over the other? And, if so when under which circumstances?

Gracias a todos!!!!
 
  • Outsider

    Senior Member
    Portuguese (Portugal)
    I would answer Joshbars' question with another question: are "Each day" and "Every day" interchangeable? Because it's the same thing. :)
     

    joshbars

    Member
    English United States
    Thanks. I have a follow up question/comment. The reason I ask this question is because the other day I was corrected by a native speaker when I said Cada Dia, I was told to use Todos Los Dias. So it struck me as to whether or not one or the other should be used in different situations or related to grammar.
     

    geostan

    Senior Member
    English Canada
    My question is whether or not "cada dia" y "todos los dias" can be used interchangeably. Are there times when one should be used over the other? And, if so when under which circumstances?

    Gracias a todos!!!!

    Cada día treats the days one by one; todos los días collectively. In informal contexts, they probably can be used interchangeably. I usually translate them as:

    cada día = each day
    todos los días = every day.

    And of course, in an expression such as "all the days of my life," only "todos los días de mi vida" would be used, unless there is a biblical expression for it. [If there is, I don't know it.]
     

    Fernando

    Senior Member
    Spain, Spanish
    Thanks. I have a follow up question/comment. The reason I ask this question is because the other day I was corrected by a native speaker when I said Cada Dia, I was told to use Todos Los Dias. So it struck me as to whether or not one or the other should be used in different situations or related to grammar.

    It is "more Spanish" "todos los días" and I prefer that expression, by large, to "cada día". Anyhow, it is interchangeable for most Spanish-speakers. Geostan has explained before the stylistic difference.
     

    mhp

    Senior Member
    American English
    Todas las mañanas Juan se despertaba antes de que su madre lo llamara.
    Cada mañana Juan se despertaba antes de que su madre lo llamara.

    Ever since this thread, I’ve wondered about this too.
     

    akakus

    Member
    Castellano-Català
    Todas las mañanas Juan se despertaba antes de que su madre lo llamara.
    Cada mañana Juan se despertaba antes de que su madre lo llamara.

    Ever since this thread, I’ve wondered about this too.

    Do you see a difference between these two sentences ? Seriously, I do not see any. Maybe I don't have a fresh mind right now.
     

    geostan

    Senior Member
    English Canada
    Todas las mañanas Juan se despertaba antes de que su madre lo llamara.
    Cada mañana Juan se despertaba antes de que su madre lo llamara.

    Ever since this thread, I’ve wondered about this too.

    I don't know why, but mañana doesn't seem to fit as neatly as día. The differences should be the same, but I find myself wanting to use cada mañana rather than todas las mañanas.

    On this one, I defer to native speakers.
     

    Zosete

    Member
    Castellano - gallego
    Someone has pointed out the reason, but I'm not sure if it's clear, so I'll try:

    According to the spanish DRAE,
    cada: U. ante un nombre numerable singular para individualizarlo dentro de la serie a que pertenece. Viene indefectiblemente cada lunes.

    So, cadais used to emphasize singularity. The RAE example is perfect: "He comes here each Monday", pinpointing Monday among the rest of weekdays. You shouldn't use "cada día" because you can't emphasize all of them; hence you should prefer "todos los días".

    Two more things:
    1. Bear in mind that "Todos los lunes" would also be correct.
    2. Most spanish aren't aware of this nuance and use them indifferently. Myself included. Cada has a nice sound.
     

    kairas

    New Member
    spanish
    I don't know why, but mañana doesn't seem to fit as neatly as día. The differences should be the same, but I find myself wanting to use cada mañana rather than todas las mañanas.

    On this one, I defer to native speakers.

    Hi, I am spanish native speaker and as you said "Cada día treats the days one by one; todos los días collectively". So between theses two sentences there is a slight difference: Cada día would intensify de feeling of repetition like one day, another day, another day, etc. Whereas todos los días would not transmite so much this repetition.
     
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