Caer bien / gustar

Magmod

Banned
England English
¿Puede alguien corregir lo siguiente si he cometido errores?:
  1. Le caiste bien(Causar buena impresión) = She likes you
  2. Le caiste mal(Causar mala impresión) = He doesn't like you
  • No me cae bien = me cae mal - I don't like him/her.
    Me cae bien - I like him/her.
    No le caigo bien - He doesn't like me.
    Le caigo bien - He likes me.
    No les cae bien - They don't like him/her.
    Les cae bien - They like him/her.
    Le caiste bien = S/he liked you etc.

Can a Spanish speaker compare this construction of caer with gustar?


For an English speaker:
Caer = to fall
I can't help falling for ( a Walls ) = I like (fall) Walls ice-cream

Me cae bien = literally > he fell for me > I like him
Le caiste bien = She liked you > You fell for him

To fall in love = enamorarse > so the Spanish speakers don't us caer here
Saludos :)
 
  • javialacarga

    Senior Member
    Spanish - Spain
    ¿Puede alguien corregir lo siguiente si he cometido errores?:
    1. Le caíste bien(Causar buena impresión) = He/She liked you
    2. Le caíste mal(Causar mala impresión) = He/She didn't like you

    • No me cae bien = me cae mal - I don't like him/her.
      Me cae bien - I like him/her.
      No le caigo bien - He/She doesn't like me.
      Le caigo bien - He/She likes me.
      No les cae bien - They don't like him/her.
      Les cae bien - They like him/her.
      Le caíste bien = He/She liked you etc.

    Can a Spanish speaker compare this construction of caer with gustar?


    For an English speaker:
    Caer = to fall
    I can't help falling for ( a Walls ) = I like (fall) Walls ice-cream

    Me cae bien = literally > he fell for me > I like him
    Le caiste bien = She liked you > You fell for him

    To fall in love = enamorarse > so the Spanish speakers don't us caer here
    Saludos :)
    I am not sure of what are you asking regarding caer/fall/enamorarse/etc
     

    stretch

    Senior Member
    From my experience, "caerle bien" is used with reference to people, while "gustar" is used for things, to put it simply. "Gustar" used with people seems to be taken in a romantic sense, and in that sense it is acceptable, but if you aren't romantically interested in someone, I would say "me cae bien".
     

    kate

    Senior Member
    Colombia- spanish
    Hola
    Desde mi punto de vista de español hablante, te digo que caer bien, es que le simpatiza (le agrada su presencia, hablar con el/ella) es como una reaccion de primera vista. Gustar en cambio es algo mas de agradar fisicamente (le gusta por que es alta/o, delgado/a, ....) y como una atraccion fisica.
    Te puede caer muy bien alguien pero al mismo tiempo no te gusta (fisicamente).
    O te puede gustar alguien pero no te cae bien (por que es creido, ...)
     

    Magmod

    Banned
    England English
    Muchas gracias por responder :thumbsup:

    ¿ Entonces cómo se conjuga las frases con gustar?:


    Mi intento así:
    • No me cae bien = me cae mal - I don't like him/her> No me gusta bien/mucho :confused:
      Me cae bien - I like him/her > Me gusta bien
      No le caigo bien - He/She doesn't like me. No le gusto bien
      Le caigo bien - He/She likes me. Le gusto bien
      No les cae bien - They don't like him/her > no les gusta bien
      Les cae bien - They like him/her.> Les gusta bien
      Le caíste bien = He/She liked you > le gustaste bien
     

    k-in-sc

    Senior Member
    U.S. English
    Bottom line!
    Don't say someone (you know personally) "te gusta" unless you are hot for them!!
    "Gustar" means "to be attractive to in a sexual sense."
    Clear now?
     
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    jinti

    Senior Member
    For an English speaker:
    Caer = to fall
    I can't help falling for ( a Walls ) = I like (fall) Walls ice-cream

    Me cae bien = literally > he fell for me > I like him But he fell for me means he likes/is in love with me, not I like/am in love with him. I think trying to remember the Spanish meaning this way may end up being more confusing than helpful.
    I think of caer bien/mal more as to come off well/poorly.

    For example:
    Some people don't come off well when you first meet them.
     

    Södertjej

    Senior Member
    Spanish ES/Swedish (utlandssvensk)
    We don't use caer for falling in love so don't try to find a connection between caer and fall for someone, as there's none.

    Caer bien/mal: My perception of that person. No romantic nuances involved at all. Tu abuela me cae muy bien, es muy simpática.

    Gustar: when using it with people we often use it when there's a romantic/sexual interest, or just to imply you find someone attractive. Me gusta mucho Brad Pitt, es guapísimo

    BUT: given the right context you can use it to mean "like" in a non romantic way: Me gusta mucho Brad Pitt, es un excelente actor. And here I mean I like him just as an actor.

    Hope this helps.
     
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    Södertjej

    Senior Member
    Spanish ES/Swedish (utlandssvensk)
    Thanks Stretch.

    And of course you don't use "caer bien" with things, just as you mentioned, unless you mean something is difficult for you to digest: no me caen bien los pimientos rojos, me producen indigestión. But that's a different meaning!
     
    Last edited:

    javialacarga

    Senior Member
    Spanish - Spain
    Muchas gracias por responder :thumbsup:

    ¿ Entonces cómo se conjuga las frases con gustar?:


    Mi intento así:
    • No me cae bien = me cae mal - I don't like him/her> No me gusta bien/mucho :confused:
      Me cae bien - I like him/her > Me gusta bien
      No le caigo bien - He/She doesn't like me. No le gusto bien
      Le caigo bien - He/She likes me. Le gusto bien
      No les cae bien - They don't like him/her > no les gusta bien
      Les cae bien - They like him/her.> Les gusta bien
      Le caíste bien = He/She liked you > le gustaste bien
    Gustar es un término que se puede usar de ambas maneras. Para expresar que alguien te cae bien o para expresar que te sientes atraído por él (físicamente, sexualmente, en sentido romántico, etc). No estoy de acuerdo en que solo se use con la segunda intención. Lo que ocurre quizás es que, al ser una palabra que da lugar a ambigüedad, muchos hablantes la marginan por miedo a ser malinterpretados, por miedo a que si dicen "Me gusta fulanito" la gente entienda que fulanito les atrae sexualmente, cuando a lo mejor no pretendían decir eso. Es más común, al menos en España, que "gustar" se use -al referirse a personas- para indicar una atracción amorosa o sexual, pero el uso es posible de ambas formas.
     

    stretch

    Senior Member
    Gustar es un término que se puede usar de ambas maneras. Para expresar que alguien te cae bien o para expresar que te sientes atraído por él (físicamente, sexualmente, en sentido romántico, etc). No estoy de acuerdo en que solo se use con la segunda intención. Lo que ocurre quizás es que, al ser una palabra que da lugar a ambigüedad, muchos hablantes la marginan por miedo a ser malinterpretados, por miedo a que si dicen "Me gusta fulanito" la gente entienda que fulanito les atrae sexualmente, cuando a lo mejor no pretendían decir eso. Es más común, al menos en España, que "gustar" se use -al referirse a personas- para indicar una atracción amorosa o sexual, pero el uso es posible de ambas formas.
    I agree, jav...and I hope this is what I indicated, or at least implied, in my first post. My preference is always to avoid the ambiguity that you mention.
     

    Milton Sand

    Senior Member
    Español (Colombia)
    Hello,
    ¿Puede alguien corregir[me] lo siguiente, si he cometido errores?:
    1. Le caíste bien (Causar buena impresión) = She likes liked you
    2. Le caíste mal (Causar mala impresión) = He doesn't didn't like you

    No me cae bien = me cae mal - I don't like him/her.
    Me cae bien - I like him/her.
    No le caigo bien - He doesn't like me.
    Le caigo bien - He likes me.
    No les cae bien - They don't like him/her.
    Les cae bien - They like him/her.

    Le caíste bien = S/he liked you etc.
    The actual sense of "gustar" is not exactly "to be liked [by]", but something like "to be delightful [to]". It brings the idea of pleasure caused by a food, or a piece of art, or a satisfying action or, passively, by a person. (I mean, a person does not have to do anything to be considered delightful by another).

    "Caer bien/mal" is just a matter of reception/opinion; it refers to a good or bad effect (social or organic) caused by the subject, not necessarily one of delight/displeasure. A food can caer bien o mal too, as well as an item of news can.

    Te gusta esa pintura. = You like (and, if you could, would get) that painting.

    Me gusta esa chica. = I like (and even want) that girl.

    Me iba cayendo mal la hamburguesa.
    = The hamburguer kind of gave me indigestion.

    No te gusta su actitud, te cae mal, ¿no? = You don't like her attitude, you find it tiresome, don't you?

    I hope this gave additional help.

    Regards,
    ;)
     
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    Magmod

    Banned
    England English
    Me cae bien = literally > he fell for me > I like him But he fell for me means he likes/is in love with me, not I like/am in love with him. I think trying to remember the Spanish meaning this way may end up being more confusing than helpful.

    For example:
    Some people don't come off well when you first meet them.
    Because Spanish conjugate gustar and caer bien back to front, I could resolve the problem for an English speaker as follows:
    • Te gusta esa pintura. = That picture is pleasing to you = You like that painting. ( is pleasing = gusta and therefore the sentence is not back to front in English)
    Similarly for an English speaker:

    • Caer = to fall
      I can't help falling for ( a Walls ) = Me cea bien Walls ice-cream = I like Walls ice-cream.
    Another example from MS:
    • No te gusta su actitud, te cae mal, ¿no? = Her attitude is not pleasing to you, .... ( can you finish the sentence using fall? :D)= You don't like her attitude, you find it tiresome ( where is the word fall in English?), don't you?
     

    stretch

    Senior Member
    Because Spanish conjugate gustar and caer bien back to front, I could resolve the problem for an English speaker as follows:
    • Te gusta esa pintura. = That picture is pleasing to you = You like that painting. ( is pleasing = gusta and therefore the sentence is not back to front in English)
    Similarly for an English speaker:

    • Caer = to fall
      I can't help falling for ( a Walls ) = Me cae bien Walls ice-cream = I like Walls ice-cream.
    Another example from MS:
    • No te gusta su actitud, te cae mal, ¿no? = Her attitude is not pleasing to you, .... ( can you finish the sentence using fall? :D)= You don't like her attitude, you find it tiresome ( where is the word fall in English?), don't you?
    I don't know if I would say "falling for" is an equivalent of "caer bien," unless of course, if in BE "to fall for" also means "to like"(in the sense of liking food, sports cars, etc.). Whenever I've heard "I'm falling for...", it usually refers to falling for/falling in love with/becoming romantically attached to a person. Is there an additional BE meaning?
     

    Magmod

    Banned
    England English
    Is there an additional BE meaning?
    To fall for is used colloquially and the Oxford dictionary's definition:
    • be captivated or deceived by, admire, yield to the charms or merits of
    I wonder if the Webseter dictionary has a definition? :)
     

    stretch

    Senior Member
    To fall for is used colloquially and the Oxford dictionary's definition:
    • be captivated or deceived by, admire, yield to the charms or merits of
    I wonder if the Webseter dictionary has a definition? :)
    Right, but what I mean is that I would only use this definition when referring to people I'm falling for, not things like "a Walls" (ice cream?).
     

    Ynez

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    Anyhow, you can really say "Me gusta" and it just means you like that person. Because you can say that of someone you just met, I could say it of an old lady, to give an example. I can't say "Me cae bien" because I don't know her enough, but there is something about her, the way she speaks, the things she says....¡Me gusta!
     

    colocha

    New Member
    English - midwest USA
    se puede decir "cuando era nina, me caia mal nadar." to mean i didn't like swimming?

    solamente se puede decir que "me caia mal" cuando hablas de una persona o una comida?

    (todavia no estoy clara.)

    gracias por su paciencia
     

    ehpb

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    Yo diría "Cuando era niña no me gustaba nadar".
    La expresión "caer mal" se utiliza especialmente para personas.
    En el caso de comidas y bebidas significa lo mismo que "sentar mal".
    Saludos
     

    stretch

    Senior Member
    se puede decir "cuando era nina, me caia mal nadar." to mean i didn't like swimming?

    solamente se puede decir que "me caia mal" cuando hablas de una persona o una comida?

    (todavia no estoy clara.)

    gracias por su paciencia
    Hi colocha,

    I agree with ehpb. Also, please don't forget to use proper punctuation, including accents when you write in Spanish.

    Welcome to the forum!
     

    Milton Sand

    Senior Member
    Español (Colombia)
    Hola:
    ¿Se puede decir: "Cuando era nina, me caía mal nadar" To mean para decir: "I didn't like swimming"?

    ¿Solamente se puede decir que "me caía mal" cuando hablas de una persona o una comida?

    (Todavía no estoy clara.)

    Gracias por su paciencia
    Hi,
    You can say "nadar me caía mal" to mean swimming used to make you sick/uncomfortable/unwell or something.
    Regards,
    ;)
     
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