caer - si le cae bien

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Talia1987

Senior Member
English
Can 'caer' mean 'to fit'?
Because I once heard my husband say 'si le cae bien, la dejo' (we don't need to go into exactly what he was talking about.....but it meant fit) and I thought that I had misheard and that he had said 'cabe'.

But yesterday there was a small gap to sit down on the bus and he said, 'No caigo aquí' -- I'm almost certain that's what he said!!
Am I mishearing?

(I realise I could just ask him, but he's not so hot on the actual rules of the Spanish language, and you guys are) :D
 
  • Talia1987

    Senior Member
    English
    Yay, thank you :)
    My teacher who learnt Castilian Spanish didn't understand it, but she is not native anyway. Is it said everywhere or just Chile? - because my husband's Chilean too.
     

    DeFulham

    Senior Member
    UK
    Spanish - Spain
    Can 'caer' mean 'to fit'?
    Because I once heard my husband say 'si le cae bien, la dejo' (we don't need to go into exactly what he was talking about.....but it meant fit) and I thought that I had misheard and that he had said 'cabe'.

    But yesterday there was a small gap to sit down on the bus and he said, 'No caigo aquí' -- I'm almost certain that's what he said!!
    Am I mishearing?

    (I realise I could just ask him, but he's not so hot on the actual rules of the Spanish language, and you guys are) :D
    Hi La.Chanchita,
    Am not sure about that 'si le cae bien, la dejo' sentence. Was he talking about clothing, not that I am being nosy here... :D

    If you talk about clothes and say caer, it could mean 'quedar bien' o 'sentar bien' which means 'it's suits you'. I have to say though that I would not use 'cear bien' for clothing but people: María me cae bien (I like Maria)

    As for the other one, I am sure you good husband meant 'No quepo aqui' (quepo comes from caer - it's just one of those wierd forms of the verb we have in Spanish to confuse foreigners ;)) which is Sapnish for 'I won't fit on that seat/gap'

    Just hope I have not missinterpretated your inicial post.
    Regards.
     

    Talia1987

    Senior Member
    English
    To tell the truth, we were in a supermarket and his (also Chilean) friend held up a German salami type thing...and made a suggestion...and my husband said 'si le cae bien, la dejo', but he was laughing at the time which is why I thought maybe I had heard wrong! Lol...

    The thing is that 'cabe' and 'cae' sound quite similar, so in that case I could have been mistaken. But yesterday he definitely said 'no caigo aquí', which I thought was strange.

    Thanks so much for taking the time :)
     

    egholst

    Member
    English
    Hello! I went searching for the whole "fit- caer" thing and found this thread. I'm living in Chile and am constantly confused by this way of using caer. I swear I've heard it in a way that would mean fit. Also, when I want to use "fit" could I use caer then? I'm not sure if you all ever reached a consensus. For example, if you are all trying to fit in a car could you say "si nos caemos" o would it be "si caemos"
    Thanks for your help!
     

    Talia1987

    Senior Member
    English
    Since posting this I've lived in Chile and can confirm that caer is used to mean fit, and is conjugated as caer normally is. It's not reflexive, so with the car it would be "si caemos".
     
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    Brimstone

    Senior Member
    México Spanish
    Hola:

    Si cabemos, en español de México. Como dice una vieja canción, caer es to fall, like in: When I saw you, I almost fell off my chair. Cuando te vi, casi me caí de la silla.

    Un saludo.
     
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