Cafe

  • Moravia

    New Member
    Portugal Portuguese
    www . loc . gov/catdir/enhancements/fy0618/2004049034-s.html

    Look for the expression in the link above.
    Thank you very much.

    Alex
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    Would you care to copy and paste at least the complete sentence, together with a description of the work from which it comes, and the approximate date of publication? I'd be glad to try to help, but not if I have to read hundreds of lines of text to find the phrase.

    Thanks.
     

    edupa

    Senior Member
    Brazil Portuguese
    Would you care to copy and paste at least the complete sentence, together with a description of the work from which it comes, and the approximate date of publication? I'd be glad to try to help, but not if I have to read hundreds of lines of text to find the phrase.

    Thanks.

    Though I am not the original asker, I decided I'd post the complete sentence where the expression in question was used, because I just couldn't help getting curious about such an odd phrase:) .

    Here it is:

    They say that in the pocket-picking game the hardest hook to pull is to take something from someone, face to face, staring them straight in the eye. It's called the sucker's kiss and Effie gave it to me--smack on the lips, you might say--right there in a crummy root-and-toot cafe in San Francisco.

    This is the last sentence in the prologue of Alan Parker's novel "The sucker's kiss". Effie is the woman who the protagonist claims is the love of his life.

    This piece was published in 2003.

    Hope this is enough now.

    Thank you!
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    In fact, rootin' tootin' is very likely an even more colloquially relaxed form of the original rooting and tooting.

    Here's a little etymological speculation:

    root and toot: boisterous.
    Root-Reduplicated form rootin' tootin' "noisy, rambunctious" is recorded from 1875.
    from Online Etymology Dict.

    and...

    ...the generally accepted theory explains "root," which first appeared in the sports fan sense in the late 1880s, as an extension of "root" as plants "take root," i.e., that the fans have bonded closely with, and "sunk their roots into" the team. A more vivid (and to me more plausible) explanation, however, has been suggested by etymologist Gerald Cohen, who points to the foot-stamping, clapping and shouting behavior of baseball fans described by 18th century sportswriters. According to Cohen, foot-stamping (or "pedal-music") was at that time a vital method of expressing support for one's team, and "rooting" originally referred to fans stamping their feet so hard that they might actually dig (or "root") holes in the ground.
    www.word-detective.com/121603.html

     
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