... caged <among, between> four walls?

Luctisonus

Member
Turkish - Turkey/Poland
hello guys, which one is correct?: to be caged between 4 walls or among 4 walls? or is it better to say: to be caged between/among walls? i mean not to include "4" is better? thanks in advance...
 
  • panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    Between walls sounds as if there are only two of them. Yesterday I was walking along a narrow path between sun-baked dry-stone walls (one wall on either side of the path).
    Among walls sounds really strange?

    Caged within has a rather literary feel to it - but that may be entirely appropriate:) Trapped inside is an alternative more prosaic version. I think you may have to say four walls - unless you can say something more about the walls, for example:
    Caged within the walls of the prison ...

    Just while on the subject of appropriate :D - please, Luctisonus, use capital letters in your posts where appropriate.
     

    Luctisonus

    Member
    Turkish - Turkey/Poland
    panjandrum said:
    Between walls sounds as if there are only two of them. Yesterday I was walking along a narrow path between sun-baked dry-stone walls (one wall on either side of the path).
    Among walls sounds really strange?

    Caged within has a rather literary feel to it - but that may be entirely appropriate:) Trapped inside is an alternative more prosaic version. I think you may have to say four walls - unless you can say something more about the walls, for example:
    Caged within the walls of the prison ...

    Just while on the subject of appropriate :D - please, Luctisonus, use capital letters in your posts where appropriate.
    ok i will use capital letters next time if necessary :D and thanks for your comment :)
     

    maxiogee

    Banned
    English
    You cannot be "caged" by walls. I don't think any preposition is going to make a sentence which implies caging by means of walls sound natural.

    A cage is a structure of bars or wires through which light and air may move but which prohibits the movement of objects larger than the space between the bars. A wall is a solid structure which may have a door or window or other opening in it, but which otherwise prohibits the movement of almost anything.

    Immured is a good word for "walled in", and doesn't count the number of walls.
     

    maxiogee

    Banned
    English
    Does the metaphor require "walls"?

    Trapped inside his blindness, or trapped by the small-town mentality and other constructions would be quite common.

    "Trapped" implies that escape is possible, even if it might be very difficult. "Immured" would be permanent.
     

    Luctisonus

    Member
    Turkish - Turkey/Poland
    maxiogee said:
    Does the metaphor require &quot;walls&quot;?

    Trapped inside his blindness, or trapped by the small-town mentality and other constructions would be quite common.

    &quot;Trapped&quot; implies that escape is possible, even if it might be very difficult. &quot;Immured&quot; would be permanent.
    Metaphor must convey the idea that person is in a situation that he cannot go anywhere.
     
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